Little River Casino Hotel and RV Manistee, Michigan RV ...

Tips on being homeless.

Some tips on being homeless because who know's when someone could use a survival tip or two:
1- Never, ever, ever borrow or accept money from anyone on the streets no matter how hard up you are. You will be owned if you do. 2- Save on Foods, Mc Donalds, Walmart, A & W & Tim Horton's all have the best Wi-fi connection. 3- Condense your life into one back pack. Simplify, simplify, simplify. This will save you mentally and physically in the end. 4- Bear spray. That is all. 5- Invest in a $10 shower vinyl Coleman pack. Stick it in a back pack and fill it up in rest stops. It's $13 dollars to shower in hotels or truck stops and that can add up very fast. 6- Find places to sleep that are dark and you can tuck yourself in 7- If you have to sleep under a bridge, tuck yourself up high and wear all black to hide yourself out from late night people sketching out or wanting to fight or looking for trouble. 8- There will always be good people who come around in spite of your situation. 9- Coleman shower pack, Truck stops, hotels & motels, Rec centers & campgrounds are good places to shower. Rivers are great for bathing. 10- If you have wheels, you are so blessed. 11- It is easier to get into a shelter if you have kids 12-Even though they say no food in your room in the shelter, some rules are meant to be broken. A back pack is great for snacks lol 13-Carry a concealed key knife- yes a key knife - easy to hide and you'll be thankful you have one. Mine was given to me by a street warrior himself. 14-Homeless life becomes so hard that it is so easy to stay stuck. DON"T STAY STUCK. 15. If you have a vehicle the best places to sleep are casino parking lots, walmart parking lots, safe feeling communities, hotel parking lots, service road truck line ups, conservatory places, river sides, crown land, ice shacks 16- A lot of people do not have your best intentions at heart so be careful what you're doing and who you take advice from when you are feeling low. 17. Remind yourself only YOU have the power to get out of the situation, 18- Most cities have community support centers and places to get food and counseling 19- The food bank line is hell. But there is some food at the end of those long awful lines. 20- The dollar store fucking rocks for little gadgets and nic-nacks if you need to set up camp somewhere 21- Try and pack a tent and find a spot you won't have to move often. Moving is so mentally draining and exhausting. 22- Don't stick around too long in one place 23- Don't buy weed off the streets. DON"T, DON"T DO IT. Don;t buy anything from anyone.. don't. 24- Don't tell anyone how vulnerable you are. People prey like motherfuckers. 25- Make up wipes work great for wiping your hands and face to freshen up. 26- Always have your toothbrush and paste with you. When you feel tired you can brush your teeth as a psychological hack to make you feel more awake to keep persevering. 27- If a street person asks you for water, it's usually to shoot up, not drink. Don't judge these poor hurting souls and save your drinking water. 28- empathize, empathize, empathize. If you are reactive to everyone and everything or are judgmental, you are hooped. 29- Always watch your back. Always. 30- Smash the tops of feet and gouge eyes if you ever get attacked and don't be afraid to fight back. 31- If you are so lucky, spend time in nature if you can 32- writing and books are a good escape and easy to pack in your bag 33-Learn to love the body you were born in real fast because doing hair and makeup ain't a thing. 34- There is a lot of free clothing that get's given out at shelters 35- Stick to yourself. Better chance at getting off the streets. 36- If you need to warm your shower pack up faster stick it under your floor heater if you have a car. 37- Get your hands on a sleeping bag and foil emergency blanket somehow 38-Always look for the beauty in the moment. Everything is art. Everything. 39-Mindset is key. Your body will always give up before your mind does. Careful what you feed your thoughts 40- Never sleep in truck stop areas. You will be meat. 41- Not all medical professionals and staff in shelters are leading you down the right path. Be choosy if you can. 42- Learn to think for yourself or else you're fucked. Intuition baby. Intuition. 43- Plug ins are found outside gas stations and fast food joints and in picnic parks to charge your phone. 44- Picking bottles will get you money. 45- Learn to wear clothing you can wake up and go to sleep in. Trust me. 46- The river valley is a good spot to hide and set up camp without hasstle for the most part. Again, don't stay in one place too long. In BC there are a lot of meth labs in forrest areas. some in alberta crown land as well. be careful. 47- Don't listen to your music or you can't hear what is coming behind you 48- Vodka helps, be mindful on how much you're consuming and if you drink too much you will be off your game to stick up for yourself if need be. 49- Shelters are sometimes are rougher than the streets but gain you access to other supports if you can get in. It is NOT EASY getting into a shelter. 50- Keep your head held high and don't give a fuck about the judgement you will receive. People will be judging no matter what you do, so fuck it. Keep going. Keep fighting the good fight. Your situation does not define you and people who judge you and look down on you DO NOT matter :)
submitted by farfenuggen to lifehacks [link] [comments]

Accessing all the Vancouver Bridges

Update notes: finished adding all the bridges, added a link to photos. I will try to format everything to be a bit nicer and/or make a copy at another location that allows for easienicer formatting.
As requested by raleighspritely in the other bridges thread, this post is intended to help generally newer riders figure out specifically how to get onto each bridge in each direction, where all most of the exit options go and any other weirdnesses each bridge may have.
I'll assume you know roughly where you are and roughly how to get to each bridge. Some are easy to find the entrances for (Burrard), some are weird (Cambie, southbound) and some have entrances a long way from where the cars access (Golden Ears) so if they're super weird I'll try and give you more specifics.
Photos from the day showing most of the bridges: https://imgur.com/a/RvTUs0V (missing: 2nd Narrows, KSB, Canada Line, Arthur Liang)
And now to talking about crossing bridges!
Granville - follow the instructions for Burrard or Cambie
If you insist on using the GSB (don't) SB access is easiest via Howe St and NB access at 5th & Granville
Burrard
Easiest to get onto IMO as the access is right at the ends of the bridge
Cambie
Going southbound on Cambie is super weird to get to unless you're already on Nelson St
Lion's Gate
North Bound:
South Bound:
Second Narrows/IronworkersThis is one of the weirdest/awkwardest, particularly at the north end
North Bound:
South Bound
Access is here basically across from Phibbs. Many ways to get to it, but you've gotta get to that spot to go south.
Exiting: takes you down through the trees, watch for the pair of switchbacks. You'll end up at the bottom of Skeena St.
Arthur Laing
I regard this as an "experts only" type bridge that I wouldn't recommend to anyone not comfortable with riding in fairly close proximity to cars. There's no separated lane and just a narrow shoulder. That said, I don't feel unsafe on this bridge for some reason, but that might just be from riding it a bunch and being used to riding next to cars. Anyways, onto how to get on/off:
Southbound: access is via the car ramp at where Marine & Granville all come together in a 6 lane clusterfuck that was meant to be the highway through Vancouver. Normally I access coming off NW Marine, onto the clusterfuck, pick up speed down the hill and (with a lot of shoulder checking) get across the right most lane onto the ramp. Go up the ramp and stick to the right.
Exiting: things get dicey/exciting. You'll be crossing roads at speed so be shoulder checking.
North Bound: you can either access off the paths off Airport Rd here or by riding north along Russ Baker Way and basically sticking right and following the signs to Vancouver.
Exiting: again a bit dicey with some potential lane crossing
Pitt River
This is one of the nicest crossings. All the recently built (or updated) bridges are really, really nice once you're on the deck (Pitt River, Port Mann, Golden Ears + Ironworkers post update).
The cycle/pedestrian lane is on the north side of the span and is nice and wide. Access on the west end requires crossing Belfast Ave/Fremont Connector that loops under the bridge. Since access is all for the one side crossing my instructions are written for West->East travel but basically just do them in reverse for East->West.
Coming from NW (Trabouley Poco Trail/Deboville Slough), you do a couple zigzags and hairpins and crossing Belfast St but you can see your target the whole time so this bridge is honestly one of the easiest to get onto.
Coming from the SW, you go under the bridge parallel to the Fremont Connector then see the access to your left. If you were to keep going on the path instead you'd eventually end up at Deboville Slough.
East end of the bridge drops you in Pitt Meadows. As you exit (eastbound) you can immediately do 180deg turn left to get onto the trails. Another left at the river to go south, north and you can make your way out to Pitt Lake on the trails. To access the trail parallel to, and on the south side of, Lougheed Highway take the left at the river then left again at Ferryslip Rd.
If you go straight Old Dewdney Trunk Rd is a pretty nice ride towards Maple Ridge.
Golden Ears
Alright, this one is possibly the most difficult unless you know exactly where to go, partly because they're a long way along the bridge from where cars access. The Southbound Access is at 113B & Airport Way (Maple Ridge/Pitt Meadows). The northbound access is at 100A Ave & 201St (Langley)
Southbound
Northbound
Access is at 100A Ave & 201St. You go up the multilevel round ramp. Your exit will basically be the aforementioned 113B roundabout, you can go straight through it to get onto Maple Meadows Way towards the mall, right will change into 203St as it turns north or go left and west towards the airport.
Canada Line Bridge
This one is on the side of the Canada Line bridge section between Marine & Cambie Station & Bridgeport Station.
North connection is on Kent Ave S @ Cambie. However you have to go east from Kent Ave N & Cambie to turn south to get onto Kent Ave S and access the ramp. If you're coming down Cambie, hang a right on Kent Ave N.
South Connection is at River Road and Van Horne Way.
If you're going North then east, my recommendation is take Cambie north, then cut east at 59th. Kent Ave N between Cambie and Ontario sucks butt and cars are frequently impatient assholes on that section (it's also rough, needs a repave and has a lot of rail tracks).
If you're going north then west you can go west on Kent Ave N and then right on Heather before climbing a bit and taking the westbound route of your choice.
If you're just going north then Cambie, Ontario & Heather are all pretty good choices with Ontario & Heather being quieter. I can't remember how all of Heather's crossings are since I haven't ridden it past 59th in years.
If you're going South, you can go:
Formatting is becoming a pain because this is getting long. Sorry!
Port Mann
This one is like the Pitt River Bridge in that the pedestrian/bike path is only on the north/east side of the bridge deck.
West access is where the Port Mann passes over United Boulevard and where Unite intersects the Mary Hill Bypass offramps. If you're coming off the bridge you can go south/west on United and eventually work your way over towards Braid Station. If you go east on the Mary Hill Bypass you can connect to the Traboulay PoCo trail, Argue St and work your way up to the Pitt River bridge. There's also a mess of trails in and around Colony Farm but you're on your own for that :)
East access is a ways up a pretty decent hill at 152st/112Ave by Dogwood Campgrounds. If you're going north/west, the signage is good. Just don't take the overpass over the highway. How you get to 152/112...up to you. It's a big grid!
Alex Fraser
Ok, this one is another bit of a mess in terms of access. I don't think this one is technically unidirectional like the others, but I recommend riding the same way as cars are travelling and this guide will be based on that. Careful on the deck, there's a bunch of spots where you have to dodge the bases of signs and other spots where the path just shifts left/right.
Southbound:
You've made it over the Queensborough or come in from Richmond. You've made it onto the Annacis Channel bridge and are approaching Annacis island. You'll see a bus-stop on an island, you want to get there (if not busy, drop the curb & cut across, otherwise there's a crosswalk to use), take the crosswalk that goes parallel to the bus-only section of intersection, onto the sidewalk on the far-far side and then left and you'll see the path onto the bridge. You'll get dropped off with the choice of left or right. Left takes you towards HWY17, River Rd which are the two options for getting to the ferry (take River, it's quieter and only marginally slower). Right will take you under the bridge, and after you go past Planet Ice you can go left towards River Rd east, right-then-right to get onto Nordel north/east or just right for the Delta-South Surrey Greenway.
If you're trying to get to South Surrey, go as if you're going up Nordel, get over the overpass, then take the trail that cuts back to the right. This is the North Delta Greenway and is superior to the DSS Greenway in basically every way including being WAY smoother (I ride it on my carbon road bike on 25mm tires).
North Bound:
Starting from Planet Ice, take the path up onto the bridge, ride across, question why you're out here and didn't just take the Massey Shuttle to get home faster...
At the north end of the bridge, you'll end up next to the Annacis exit ramp. At the end of it, you want to take the small crosswalk onto the island with the bus stop, across Cliveden ave onto the island on the far side, then across another little crosswalk onto the path and hang a left. Stick to this path, you'll go back over the Annacis Channel and find yourself at a zig-zagging ramp. At the bottom of that you have the options of:hard right: path through to Hamilton Highway Park where you can take an overpass towards River Rd
left then right: onto Boundary Rd then Dyke rd, you can use this to get over towards Westminster Highway via Fraserwood Way.
left then left (generally recommended): take Boundary Rd north. At Boundary & Boyd you can go right to the Queensborough or left onto Westminster Hwy which you can use to get all the way to Richmond or to connect to River Rd
Queensborough
because New West is at a 45deg angle I'll be using "up/down and top/bottom" for this bridge because it's effectively a hill. Top is 22nd St station end, bottom is Queensborough Landing.
The top connection is just below 22nd St Station. If you're coming from 22nd St station just take the bridge down, it'll drop you on Boyd St. Left takes you to QB Landing. Right takes you to...not a lot. It's narrow, you'll probably have to slow down a bunch as you pass people.
If you're coming from Market Crossing area or New West (both via Marine Dr) I recommend taking the "up" side of the bridge down because it has about 1% of the traffic the "down" side does.
To get to it, the access is the ramp on the "cars up" side of the bridge. Otherwise, you can use the ramp on the "cars down" side to connect to the "down" side.
Either way as you're going down, watch for the hairpins at the bottom!
If you're going up and heading to downtown New West take the "up" side. Head east along Marine/Stewardson. You can eventually head right down a side street to get to S&O because that's why you're in New West right? If not, you're at S&O now. Best way to get through to the rest of downtown is via the Quay.
If you're going up and heading to anywhere else take the "down" side and go all the way to 22nd St Station. Right and past the station connects to 7th Ave across New West. Left you can use to get onto both Marine Dr or Marine Way to go west to Market Crossing, Big Bend, Glenlyon, River District. Straight turns into the BC Parkway and travels under the skytrain past Edmonds, Royal Oak, Metrotown stations.
Knight St
Recommendation: if you can, keep going west and take the Canada Line Bridge. This bridge was NOT intended for cyclists at all as you're about to learn and this section may get a little rant-y.
Northbound:
Southbound (I haven't gone SB on this bridge in a long time)
Access is via the onramp at Inverness & Marine. If crossing SB on Inverness watch for cars not understanding how stoplights work and driving into the intersection.
Take the on-ramp, hop onto the sidewalk.
First exit is Mitchell Island, get across the island. Get back onto the sidewalk.
Second exit is Bridgeport and provided you take that off-ramp you'll end on a sidewalk on Bridgeport pointed west. First intersection will be Sweden Way, turn left for IKEA, right takes you up to Vulcan Way which can be used to connect to River, No5 & No6 Rds.
Opinion: the KSB needs a cycling infrastructure update more than the GSB. The GSB is bad, but at least Cambie and Burrard are basically adjacent.
Oak St Bridge
Disclaimer: I have ridden across this bridge exactly once, only north bound on the southbound side. I will provide links to where I think the access to the NB path is, but I can't guarantee it.
This accesses I used for this bridge are near enough to the Canada Line Bridge so I would recommend just using that. Also the access Oak St Bridge are all off bigger roads so just awkward to get to.
The north end of the SB path is a crosswalk between 71st Ave & 72nd Ave on Oak St. ( https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B012'22.1%22N+123%C2%B007'49.4%22W/@49.2061485,-123.1325803,765m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.2061446!4d-123.1303973 )
The south end of the SB path is at the southeast end of the Shanghai Wonderful restaurant parking lot. https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B011'30.5%22N+123%C2%B007'10.7%22W/@49.1918179,-123.1201938,191m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.1918174!4d-123.1196477
I *think* the south end of the NB path is here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B011'25.0%22N+123%C2%B006'55.9%22W/@49.1902744,-123.1163805,382m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.1902728!4d-123.1155145
I don't know how to get there.
I think the north end of the NB path is effectively the intersection of SW Marine @ Shaughnessy St. https://www.google.com/maps/place/49%C2%B012'17.7%22N+123%C2%B007'45.5%22W/@49.2047843,-123.1293076,104m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m6!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d49.2049204!4d-123.1293171
Once you're on the bridge it's just ride along until you're at the other end. The surface is weird concrete sections that have all gone a bit convex so it's a weird kinda bumpy ride.
rest to be continued later including: Pitt River, Golden Ears, Port Mann, Alex Fraser, Queensborough, Knight St, Canada Line, Oak St and Arthur Laing. If you need to go between New West and Surrey I recommend just taking the Skytrain.
submitted by unclebumblebutt to vancouvercycling [link] [comments]

Welcome to the B.L.o.K. (Big List of Kelowna)

Tons of posts are asking about this town (mine included), so I decided to go through the /kelowna history and put all the responses in a central place. It can be a guide for visitors and Kelowna newbies in general. All the information has been gathered exclusively from posts here. If you'd like to add anything to the list, or see any errors, reply below and I'll add it to the main post below. (Mods, if this is long-term useful, you can sticky it.)

Activities & Things To Do

Indoor

Outdoor

Barber

Bike Rental

Breweries / Craft Beer

Camping

BC Parks Campgrounds Reserve

Other Camping

Concert Hosts / Weeklies / Promoter Events

Dispensaries

Dog Parks

Festivals & Annual Large Events

Fly Fishing

Food and Restaurants

Asian

Chinese

Dog-friendly

Good for Groups

Indian

Ramen

Thai

Brunch

French

Hamburgers

Italian

Mexican / Comida Latina

Pies

Pizza

Subs / Sandwhiches

Sushi

Tasting Menus

Steakhouse

Vegan & Vegetarian

Not Dedicated Vegan, but a Decent Vegan Selection

Wineries

Wings

Gaming

Gyms

Hiking

Ice Skating

Internet Service Providers

Live Music

Mountain Biking

Nightlife / Clubs

Places to Avoid

Real Estate Agents

Salons

Hair

Nails

Skiing & Snowboarding

Local, within 90 minutes

Within a few hours drive

Helicopter

Cross Country & Nordic

Strippers

Swimming Pools

Taxis / Driver Service

(There's no Uber or Lyft in Kelowna)

Tailor

Tattoos

Theatre

Thrift Stores / Consignment Stores

Veterinarians

Watch Hockey

Wineries

Yoga

submitted by Indy_Pendant to kelowna [link] [comments]

Happening in Indiana: July 22nd - 28th

My computer had a mini heart attack last night and I wasn't about to do this on a cellphone... So here's the latest happenings with a slight delay!
All my information comes from VisitIndiana so the list is not 100% comprehensive. If you know of anything that's missing, please post and share with everyone! If you've ever been to any of these events, or if you go this week, please share your experiences
Also be sure to visit the city-specific subreddits
This Week Only
Northwest Indiana
Ouibache Music Festival - July 27, 730-930pm, at Delphi Opera House. This quintet of locally grown musicians formed in 2000 celebrating American Roots music with a flair for jazz and anything else. Proceeds from the concert will benefit the missions of the Ouibache Music Festival and the Delphi Opera House
Old Lighthouse Museum S.S. Eastland Memorial - July 27 at the Old Lighthouse Museum. At 11am, the 104th Anniversary Memorial of the S.S. Eastland will commence, Station Michigan City Coast Guard will place a wreath in Trail Creek where Indiana Transportations dock was located. Father Lev of the Holy Trinity Orthodox Church will say memorial prayers. Speakers will tell the horrific story of the Eastland tragedy. WEFM 95.9 live radio will be at the museum from 9am-noon. The museum will be open free of charge today only from noon-4pm.
Gatsby at the Gardens - July 27, 6-9pm, at Friendship Botanic Gardens. Step into a Great Gatsby Garden Party! Enjoy a speakeasy evening set in the 1920's. Stroll the gardens, sip some giggle water, play bocce or badminton or cut the rug while listening to live jazz. $45; 21+event
Main St. Tour & Taste of White - July 26, 500-1130pm, at Downtown Monticello. Concert-style music and delicious food/beverages. You won't want to miss this night of entertainment!
New Carlisle Hometown Days - July 26-28 at 300 E Michigan St. New Carlisle Hometown Days is a 3 day family fun-filled weekend. Friday night we offer fireworks, parade on Sat, car show, famous wiffleball contest, kiddie tractor pull, bouncy houses, games, various vendors, food and entertainment.
Downtown Tractor Show - July 27, 8am-3pm, at 124 N. Michigan St. The streets of Downtown Plymouth will be filled with Tractors, Garden Tractors, Pedal Tractors and Hit-n-Miss Engines! There will also be food trucks with yummy treats to purchase. Autumn Leed and the River City Band will be playing from 12:00 pm til 2:00 pm. This is a FREE, family-friendly event!
Jasper County Fair - July 20-27 at the Jasper County Fairgrounds on State Road 114. The annual fair includes rides, games, demolition derby, food vendors, craft vendors and more!
U.S. Military All-Star Baseball Game - July 22, 7-10pm, at Oil City Stadium. The U.S. Military All-Stars will return to Northwest Indiana for a stop on this year’s Red, White & Blue Tour as they continue the mission of promoting the awareness of all Americans in support of the honorable sacrifices our armed forces make. The team is comprised of active duty servicemen from all branches of service around the world.
25th Annual Pierogi Fest - July 26-28 throughout Whiting. Taking place in Whiting, Indiana, Pierogi Fest® celebrates Eastern European food and culture with a wacky familial twist. Pierogi Fest® welcomes all to celebrate Eastern European heritage while poking a little fun at the same time.
Festival of Magic - July 26-28 at the Aftermath Cidery and Winery. Join Aftermath Cidery and Winery for a family-friendly trip to everyone's favorite boarding school! Visit all locations on your map to complete the scavenger hunt and win a prize: Hogwarts, Diagon Alley, King's Cross, the Leaky Barrel, and more! Each location will offer both Adult Potions and drinks for Little Wizards and Witches
Northeast Indiana
Park-inn Movies: The Sandlot - July 25, 930-1130pm, at Potawatomi Inn. Bring your blanket or lawn chair to the lawn overlooking Lake James. Admission is free to Inn Guests, Campground Guests and with paid admission to Pokagon State Park. (Weather Permitting).
Auburn Downtown Cruise-In - July 25, 530-800pm, at Courthouse Square. Join classic car enthusiasts around Courthouse Square downtown. See restored cars and other special vehicles of interest at this free event. Bring your family and stroll the streets, shop, have dinner in one of our local restaurants. There will be door prizes and a Crew's Choice Award for the most popular car. All show vehicles should arrive no earlier than 5:30 pm. Please enter at the corner of 7th & Cedar in order to check in and receive registration forms. All Cruise In's are held in Downtown Auburn around the square (Cedar, 9th, and Main.)
Berne Swiss Days - July 25-27 throughout Berne. The Swiss Day Celebration is a time for Berne to share it’s heritage with authentic Swiss costume, great food, craft vendors and merchandise. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the friendly competitions for all ages. From the 5K race to Big Wheel Competition for the younger ones to the Steintoss, there is something for everyone. On stage and around the festival you can hear Swiss music. Watch as couples dance the polka to live music on stage.
Allen County Fair - July 23-28 at the Allen County Fairgrounds. We welcome families to the 30th Annual Allen County Fair July 23rd to July 28th at the Allen County Fairgrounds, located off Carroll Road in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The 2019 Allen County Fair is home to Allen County 4-H and features many animal shows, projects and events throughout the week. In addition to 4-H festivities, the fair offers a full food court, carnival rides, and lengthily list of family-fun events. Highlighted events include: free ice cream social, hot air balloon fight/glow, 4X4 truck pull, demo derbies, kids day, live music, peddle truck races and much more.
Fort Wayne Pride Fest - July 26-27 at Headwaters Park. The two day event features live entertainment, vendor market, a beer tent, food plaza, workshops, tournaments, KidSpace and fun with the community! There are a variety of opportunities available for businesses and individuals who are looking to support Pride in the Fort including sponsorship, vendors, and volunteering. Pride is committed to bringing events throughout the year to build a stronger LGBTQ community outside of the festival. Check out our events page for more info.
Colonial America on the Frontier - July 27-28, 10am-6pm, at The Old Fort. Enjoy the sights, sounds, and smells of the American Revolution at Fort Wayne’s Historic Old Fort. The Continental Army and British forces will be on hand to provide live demonstrations throughout the day on period specific artillery and military maneuvers. Re-enactors will also bring to life the daily activities of this time period through demonstrations on period cooking, gardening, blacksmithing, and much more! The Fort will be open to the public: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 27, and 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, July 28. Tours of the Fort will be offered throughout the weekend.
Elkhart County 4-H Fair - July 19-27 at the Elkhart County 4-H Fairgrounds. he fair hosts nationally known musical artists during their 5-night concert series. A sanctioned rodeo, PPL tractor pull, and demolition derby are also highlighted at the free grandstand during fair week. Bring your appetite and explore famous food row. With more than 70 food stands, the fair takes pride in offering mouth-watering, once-a-year, fair favorites. Over 3,000 4-H livestock and more than 4,000 4-H still exhibits are shown during the 9-day event. Daily entertainment can be been found on every corner of the grounds, with multiple shows and exhibits included with your gate admission. Thrill seekers of all ages will want to visit the mid-way, complete with roller coasters, games and kiddie rides for the young fairgoers.
Amishland and Lakes Bicycle Tour - July 27-28, 6am-1pm, at Lakeland High School. Amishland and Lakes, based at Lakeland High School in LaGrange, Indiana, visits a world where lifestyles have remained almost unchanged for over a hundred years. One of the friendliest rides around, you’ll enjoy seeing and meeting families, women’s groups, regional cycling clubs, and tandem pairs who tell us they love our routes because they are so “tandem friendly.” There are wide open spaces, clean country air, friendly people and lots of great food. There is plenty to explore, experience and eat. Amishland and Lakes is famous for great SAG food (watermelons, peaches, blueberries, bananas, fresh baked cookies and more), and there are also Amish bakeries, restaurants and homemade ice cream parlors along the route. The routes range from 22 to 100 miles, offering smooth, quiet roads, where buggies are numerous and cars are few (both days begin and end at the High School). We also offer directions for a do-it-yourself Friday option to ride the Pumpkinvine Nature Trail. Camping is available at the 4-H Fairgrounds across from our start location. For more details go to http://amishlandandlakes.com
11th Annual Dixie Day Festival and Arts & Craft Fair - July 27, 8am-5pm, at 102 S. Morton St. The Dixie Day festival honors the landmark sternwheel paddle boat. It also encourages everyone to visit North Webster. The Dixie Boat has been cruising Webster Lake every summer since 1929 and attracted more than 13,000 riders last season. Dixie Day Festival is a dream come true with a list of activities and events that continue to grow. Extra Dixie cruises will be added for Saturday afternoon of the festival as well as the regular evening cruises. What to expect: North Webster Fire Department Pancake/sausage breakfast - 7am until out, Arts and Craft fair- 10a- 4p, 5K Run like a Pirate/Walk like a Captain, Car, truck, and bike show 10a-3pm, Boat show- 8am-4pm, Delicious food trucks, Tractor Show 10a-3p, and Ride the Dixie Sternwheel on beautiful Webster Lake.
Lauren Talley - July 23, 7-9pm, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Showtime: 7:00pm | Doors Open: 6:30pm Prices: Tickets Only - $19.95 | Dinner and Theater - $37.95
The Taylors - July 25, 7-9pm, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Showtime: 7:00pm | Doors Open: 6:30pm Prices: Tickets Only - $19.95 | Dinner and Theater - $37.95
Legacy Five - July 26-27, 7-9pm, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Showtime: 7:00pm | Doors Open: 6:30pm Prices: Tickets Only - $39.95 | Dinner and Theater - $57.95
Central Indiana
SetonFest - July 25-27, 6-10pm, at St. Elizabeth Seton Catholic Church. SetonFest is a three-day festival that includes carnival rides, a different band each night, food, bingo, a casino, beer garden and more. Free parking and free admission.
2019 Topgolf Tour - July 22, 6-11pm, at Topgolf Fishers. Team up, play and earn your way to Las Vegas and $50,000. There are 19 Regional Tournaments at Topgolf locations across the US, UK, and Australia, between June 18 and August 14. Playing a variety of Topgolf signature games that test strategy and accuracy, two-person teams compete against one another for a spot at the Topgolf Tour Championships in Las Vegas, with full VIP treatment. Only one team from each Regional Tournament makes it through to compete for the glory and a life changing prize. WHAT'S INCLUDED Entry into Topgolf Tour Regional Tournament, Minimum 2.5 hours of game play, Hot buffet, Official Topgolf Tour Insulated Water Bottle, $5 donation to Bunkers in Baghdad from every US player registration.
25th Annual Frankfort Hot Dog Festival - July 26-27 at Prairie Creek Park. Indiana's largest two-day hot dog festival features vendors, family fun, hot dog eating contests, dachshund races and HOT DOGS!
Gas City Concerts in the Park Presents Keith Anderson - July 23, 7pm, at Gas City Park. This is a FREE concert brought to you by the Gas City Concerts in the Park committee.
Gas City Concerts in the Park Presents The Park Avenue Band - July 26, 7pm, at Gas City Park. This is a FREE concert brought to you by the Gas City Concerts in the Park committee
Indy Shorts International Film Festival - July 25-28, 10am-10pm, at the Indianapolis Museum of Art at Newfields. The Indy Shorts International Film Festival, presented by Heartland Film and the organizers of the Heartland International Film Festival (HIFF), is an Academy Award®-qualifying fest dedicated to the art of short film! Last summer, Indy Shorts expanded as its own separate event from HIFF, becoming the largest short film festival in the Midwest - showcasing storytelling from around the world. All winners (Grand Prize and Audience Choice Awards) will play encore screenings at HIFF in October 2019. General ticket info at https://heartlandfilm.org/indyshorts/.
Athenaeum Soireé: An Affair on the Ave - July 25, 630-900pm, at Athenaeum Foundation, 401 East Michigan St. The Athenaeum Soireé: An Affair on the Ave is an annual fundraiser featuring pairings of culinary creations and delicious handcrafted beverages from local establishments as well as live entertainment, silent auctions and more at this business casual, 21+ indoor event.
7th Annual Iron Eagle Paddle & Run - July 27, 8am-6pm, at Eagle Creek Park. Athletes of all ages can explore Eagle Creek Park, one of the nation’s largest city parks, via land and water alternating between trail runs and a canoe/kayak leg. Starting at the beach, the race consists of a 2.5-mile trail run, 1.5-mile paddle and 2.5-mile trail run back to the beach. Participants can enter as an individual or 2-person team. They have the option to bring personal kayaks or canoes with life jackets and paddles, or rent a boat in advance from Eagle Creek Outfitters. Spectators are more than welcome to come show support. Awards will be presented to the top solo female, the top solo male, the top team and the top relay team. An after party will be held post-race at the Earth Discovery Center. 100% of proceeds benefit the Eagle Creek Park Foundation. To Register: Visit EagleCreekPark.org
RhumFest 2019 - July 27, 2-10pm, at Kokomo Arts Pavilion in Foster Park. Enjoy live music by local students and instructors of Rhum Academy of Music in Kokomo. Free admission. Bring everyone for a family-friendly day of great music, art, food, and fun in Foster Park. With back-to-back performances in a variety of styles and genres all day you are sure to hear some music you love!
Tippecanoe County 4-H Fair - July 20-27 at the Tippecanoe County Fairgrounds. All phases of agriculture, 4-H exhibits, wide variety of youth activities, carnival rides, games and mouth watering fair food.
Tuesday on the Trail Nature Walk - July 23, 6-7pm, at the Haan Museum of Indiana Art. Get a closer look at nature as a guide leads you on an educational walk along our Nature Trail. The trail is about a mile long loop in the Museum’s three acre woods making it feel very much like a wilderness experience in the middle of town. Meet at the Nature Trail Entrance located at the south side of the Carriage house just off the parking lot. Fee: FREE
Bicentennial Park Summer Concert: Random Reaction - July 27, 7-9pm, at Bicentennial Park. Located at the corner of Indiana and Main Streets, the park is convenient to local restaurants to enjoy before the show. Popular local group Random Reaction will take the stage on July 27. Live music begins at 7 pm; bring your lawn chairs or blankets. Free.
47th Annual Vintage Motorbike Show - July 24-28 at the Jay County Fairgrounds. The LARGEST vintage motor bike show in the USA. Join us to reminisce the Simplex, Mustang, Whizzer, Cushman motorbikes and more! $5 admission fee per person/per day charged at the Fairground's front gate. Gates open at 6 AM daily.
Southern Indiana
Jackson County Fair - July 22-28 at the Jackson County Fairgrounds. The Jackson County Fair is the biggest and best! Still a free fair, find building after building of exhibits, visit barns, enjoy the midway and delicious food. Great grandstand events and racing!
Bluegrass on the Square - July 27, 4-8pm, at Historic Downtown Corydon. Since its inception in 2003, Bluegrass on the Square has featured some of the most well-known Bluegrass musicians in the region. Now in its 16th year. All concerts are free and open to the public. July 27 features Hog Operation and Ida Clare
Master Gardeners and 4-H Llamas & Alpacas Club - July 27, 800am-1230pm, at 400 Block Laffollette Station. Join us for Two Special Events;; Master Gardeners will be a the Market answering your Gardening questions and Floyd County 4H Club will be bringing the Alpacas & Llamas.
Purple Veins: a tribute to Prince - July 27, 630-900pm, at Lincoln Amphitheatre. Purple Veins aim to re-create the magical power and energy of a classic Prince show circa 1985: an all-out dance party with relentless funk, all the hits, tasty lesser-known classics, theatrical elements, and dance choreography woven into it. Their aim is to be all-inclusive, with an age range of 18 to 40 and multiple ethnicities within the band..to both reach his music to millennials who didn’t live through it and transport those that did back in time to their younger days. With a charismatic and soulful frontman, a huge ensemble (16 plus!) of the funkiest cats, sultriest singers, and hottest dancers Wisconsin has to offer, Purple Veins is THE tribute show of all Prince tributes.
Country Roads Shop Hop - July 25-28, 10am-5pm, at Country Roads of Dearborn and Ripley Counties. Six Antique, Vintage and/or Home Decor shops will be combining forces to give you an unforgettable shopping week, with the chance to win big in the process! You can start and end at whichever shop you would like. Get your brochure stamped at each location and you’ll be entered to win our Grand Prize Drawing, $150 in gift certificates! ($25 from each participating shop) * Must be 18 yrs or older to be entered and Limit 1 per family* No purchase is necessary to receive a stamp, but it will be difficult not to purchase anything when you see what these amazing shops have to offer! Are you ready for some Antique, Vintage or Home Decor shopping and hopping? Hop all over the country roads and visit each participating shop! The Greenbriar Shop - Guilford, IN, The White Swan - Moores Hill, IN, The Blue Willow House - Dillsboro, IN, The Rustic Nail - Dillsboro, IN, The Whistle Stop - Milan, IN, The Huntington Carriage House - Milan, IN.
Wild Women's Hike - July 27, 10am-12pm, at McCormick's Creek State Park, 250 McCormick's Creek Park Rd. All are welcome to join us for the monthly DNK hike at McCormick's Creek State Park! The hike is free, but there is an entrance fee to get into the park. We'll be meeting at the Wolf Cave Parking area for about a 2-mile hike. Click here for the park map: https://www.in.gov/dnparklake/files/mccormicks_creek_trail.pdf Can't wait to hit the trail with you!
ONGOING EVENTS
Northwest Indiana
Chesterton's European Market - Saturdays May through October at Third St and Broadway, Downtown Chesterton. An outdoor family/artisanal market held in historic downtown Chesterton from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Gary Southshore Railcats at U.S. Steel Yard - Various days at US Steel Yard. A day at U.S. Steel yard is non-stop fun, and that's even without the baseball! The RailCats promise a wide array of laugh-out-loud between inning entertainment, great giveaways , jaw-dropping fireworks and a family-first, kid-friendly atmosphere!
Miller Woods Hike Sundays - Every Sunday at Miller Woods. The hike starts at the National Lakeshore's Paul H. Douglas Center and travels through varied habitats including rare and beautiful black oak savanna and offers incredible views of Lake Michigan and Chicago. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water and insect repellent. This hike is offered every Sunday from 1:30 to 3:30pm.
61: An Exhibit Celebrating the 61st National Park - July 2 - Sep 21 at the Indiana Welcome Center, 7770 Corinne Dr. The 6,500-square-foot exhibit hall will be transformed to represent the 15,000 acres of diverse landscapes and highlight activities available to those that visit the park system. The exhibit will feature 12 trail stops. There will be interactive exhibits for children along the trail, selfie stations and a large “sandbox” for building sandcastles. Visitors will also have the opportunity to learn about the 1,100 native plant species, rare and migrating birds, as well as recreational opportunities like camping, hiking, kayaking and cross-country skiing. Interactive activities will also give children a chance to become a Junior Ranger!
Summer Market on the Lake - Thursdays through the end of August at Festival Park, 111 E Old Ridge Road. Come enjoy outdoor shopping featuring fresh produce, baked goods, ethnic and gourmet foods, beer garden, local live entertainment, jewelry, handmade crafts and so much more.
LaPorte Farmer's Market - Saturdays July through the end of October at Monroe St and Lincoln Way. The LaPorte Farmer's Market strives to build and strengthen the local food movement in LaPorte by showcasing our region's bounty and economic opportunities locally.
Summer Sundown Music Series - Sundays May through August. Bring the lawn chairs or blankets and enjoy Sunday evenings listening to a different musical artist each week. Each Sunday evening you will find yourself at a different park with new musical artist. Check online to see where and who will be appearing!
Michigan City Municipal Band Concerts - Thursdays in June, July, and August, at the Washington Park Guy Foreman Amphitheater. Experience free live musical performances under the stars near the shores of Lake Michigan in Washington Park. Seating available or bring your own chair. June-August, Thursdays 7:30pm.
Light Keeper Harriet Colfax Month - July 1-31, 1-4pm, at Old Lighthouse Museum, 100 Heisman Harbor Rd. Harriet Colfax came into the 1858 Light House in 1861 an served faithfully until her retirement in 1904. Learn more about his Great Lakes legend all month long. The Michigan City Historical Society commissioned a color portrait of Harriet by local artist Wendy Wilcox Kerman. Come and view the portrait and enjoy the historic museum and don't forget to browse the gift shop.
Michigan City's Farmers Markets - Saturdays July - October at 801 S Washington St. and 1500 Franklin St. Saturdays through October 26th, 2019. Michigan City's Farmers Market aims to provide our community with the freshest produce, providing a space filled with locally grown food and artisan goods
Market on the Square - Fridays June through August, 3-9pm, at Founders Square. There will be over 20 vendors selling unique crafts, fresh produce, honey, flowers, breads and jams. Plus local food vendors selling food. Bands from the region will begin at 6. Then to top off the evening we will have a family movie at dusk.
Keepers of the Fire: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi - April 2019 to January 2020 at The History Museum. The rich history, culture, and art of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi is shared in this vibrant exhibit about the thriving community. Through interviews and oral histories, sculpture and beadwork, art and artifacts, the exhibit immerses visitors in the traditions and teachings of the Pokagon Band.
South Bend Cubs at Four Winds Field - Various days at Four Winds Field. The South Bend Cubs are the Class A minor league affiliate of the World Series Champion Chicago Cubs. Over the past 30 seasons, the team has won five Midwest League titles and has captured 12 division titles. In 2015 the team was named Ballpark Digest's Team of the Year and received the John H. Johnson President's Award, the highest award in minor league baseball.
The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Show - May 4th 2019 to May 2nd 2020, 6-9pm, at the DoubleTree by Hilton. America’s largest interactive murder mystery dinner show! The Dinner Detective provides a hilarious evening of murder mystery, a 4-course meal, and a prize package for the top sleuth. Just beware, the killer might be sitting right next to you!
Northeast Indiana
Fort Wayne TinCaps at Parkview Field - Various days at Parkview Field. The TinCaps are entering their 10th season at Parkview Field, which has been rated as Minor League Baseball's No. 1 Ballpark Experience four consecutive years.
Faces of Middlebury - May 17th to October 4th throughout Middlebury. Grab your cameras and the map to locate each “face of Middlebury” and insert your face for the perfect picture. Free maps are available at local businesses and organizations. Post your pics on Middlebury Then & Now’s Facebook page or on Instagram using #facesofmiddlebury. Can you find all of them, up to 30 "faces"?
Gangsters, Saloons and Buggies on Roofs Guided Tour - May 29th to September 25th at the Downtown Middlebury library. You wouldn't know Middlebury had a rough-and-tumble past, but behind today's modern facades lie tales of small-town mischief, hoods on the lam and possible mysterious passageways. Get the inside story and secrets from a local with this tour of downtown. Tours are offered at 10am every Wednesday and at 630pm the first Tuesday of each month. Walking tour is approximately 1 hour. Allow time after the tour to visit the unique shops and restaurants in the area. $5 Group tours are available by advanced reservation (call 574.825.5601)
Giant Toadstools and the World's Fair Guided Walking Tour - May 30th to September 26th at the Krider World's Fair Garden. Enjoy a guided tour through living history! The Krider family of Middlebury once captured the imagination of the world. This tour of the garden that bears their name opens a window to the family's nursery at the height of its creative powers. The beauty will take your breath away, just as it did at the Chicago World's Fair in 1933. Tours are offered at 10am every Thursday and at 630pm the first Tuesday of each month. Walking tour is approximately 1 hour. Allow time after the tour to visit the museum, unique shops and restaurants in the area. $5 Group tours are available by advanced reservation (call 574.825.5601)
A Simple Sanctuary, the new musical - March 28th to October 31st at the Blue Gate Theatre. She prayed the day would never come, but when her past comes calling, Melissa James has no choice but to flee. Pursued and living on the run, she finds desperate sanctuary and surprising friendship in Amish country. Part suspense, part romance, A Simple Sanctuary is a compelling story of love tested, the cost of freedom, and the solace found in true community.
Shipshewana Flea Market - Tuesdays and Wednesdays from May through September, 8am-4pm, at the Shipshewana Auction. Nearly 700 open-air booths on 40 acres await you at the Midwest’s Largest Flea Market. Food courts, restrooms, scooter rentals and rest areas are on site. Open rain or shine. Also open for Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, and new weekend markets on August 16-17 (MotheDaughter Days). Antique Auctions are every Wednesday inside the Antique & Miscellaneous building.
Shipshewana Breakfast Club - Fridays in July and August, 830-1100am, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Breakfast: 8:30am | Program: 10:00am Price: $26.00 - Includes Breakfast and Show These concerts will be held at the Blue Gate Theatre July 12 - Lynda Randle July 19 - Allison Speer July 26 - The Taylors Aug 2 - King's Brass Aug 9 - Doug Anderson Aug 16 - Old Time Preacher's Quartet Aug 23 - Soul'd Out Quartet Aug 30 - TBA
Central Indiana
Kroger Symphony on the Prairie - Saturdays and Sundays at Conner Prairie. The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra's summer series provides music from classical, pop, and rock genres from mid-June through Labor Day weekend. See performance schedule online indianapolissymphony.org
Celebrate the 10th Year of Tenderloin Tuesdays - Tuesdays in July throughout Hamilton County. Celebrating the 10th year, dine along the Tenderloin Trail™. Don’t miss Tenderloin Tuesdays™ in July along the tastiest trail. Each Tuesday restaurants offer special deals on the Hoosier delicacy. For a complete list of participating restaurants in Carmel, Fishers, Noblesville, Westfield and Northern Hamilton County, visit TenderloinTrail.com.
Hot Wheels: Race to Win - May 18th to July 28th at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines and hold on tight as we open our Hot Wheels: Race to Win exhibit celebrating speed, safety, design, and power. Get revved up for the special performances, activities, and the occasional pit stop.
Treasures of Ancient Greece exhibit - Jun 15 to Jan 5 at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. This once-in-a-lifetime immersive exhibition brings to Indianapolis more than 150 ancient objects and artifacts, many of which have never been seen outside of Greece. The ancient Greeks revered the human body, and many of the depictions are nude. Featured are bronze and marble statues, gold jewelry and funerary objects, exquisite pottery, artifacts of the world’s first democracy, and an extraordinary replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, known as the world’s first computer.
Mind Tripping Show - March 1st to December 28th, 8:30-10PM at the Hilton Indianapolis Hotel and Suites. Mind Tripping: a Comedy with a Psychological Twist is an interactive show by Christian & Katalina, the #1 Husband and Wife Comedy Mind Reading Act in the Nation. Be a part of a mind-bending, reality-twisting interactive theatrical show. Think Candid Camera meets the Twilight Zone. Be prepared to have your perceptions challenged and your expectations turned upside down
Naturally Inspired Art Exhibition - May 24th to August 21st at The Indianapolis Zoo. After the paintings have dried and been professionally framed by The Great Frame Up Downtown, they are displayed for the summer in the Schaefer Rotunda at White River Gardens. Plus, you also get to enjoy the works of some of our more artistically inclined animals. Who knows — you may see a penguin Picasso, a walrus Warhol, an elephant Escher and many others! The Naturally Inspired Art Show presented by The Great Frame Up Downtown is included with Zoo admission.
Nickelodeon’s PAW Patrol Adventure Play - February 23 to July 28th at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. The hero pups of Adventure Bay are coming to The Children’s Museum, and they need your help. It’s time to run some rescue missions, as we work together to overcome challenges and help everyone in Adventure Bay. Enter the Lookout. Save the Day in Adventure Bay. Be a Helping Hero on Jake’s Mountain.
The National Bank of Indianapolis Summer Nights Film Series - Various days June-August, at The Amphitheater. You can watch movies under the stars every weekend at Newfields. Doors open at 7 pm, when you can enjoy a picnic dinner, music, and activities, followed by that night’s movie, which will begin when twilight turns to night (usually 9:30 pm). Over the summer, over 20 movies will be shown—everything from black-and-white classics to modern blockbusters. All you need is a picnic (with non-alcoholic beverages only), chairs (for the back row of each tier), and blankets (in case the chair row is full). You will also want sunscreen and bugspray. No alcohol, pets, candles taller than 12 inches, or knives permitted. And if you want to travel light with just a chair and blanket, concessions will be available to purchase. Check out discovernewfields.org/summer-nights-2019 to see available films and to purchase tickets once they are available.
Zoolapalooza Concert Series - Fridays in June and July, 530-830pm, at the Indianapolis Zoo. Under the Bicentennial Pavilion, this incredibly fun night out is a great way to kick off summer weekends on Friday evenings with terrific live music. Concerts are free for members and included with Zoo admission, so you can play all day and dance all night! Seating under the Bicentennial Pavilion includes open tables on a first-come, first-serve basis
The Generous Pour at The Capital Grille, July 8 - Sep 1, 5-9pm, at 40 W. Washington Street. The Capital Grille’s annual The Generous Pour wine event has returned for its eleventh year. This year’s theme is Legends of the Land, where guests can sip on any combination of seven select wines including the Maggy Hawk 2015 Pinot Noir, the 2015 Cenyth Red Blend, and the Arrowood 2013 Red Blend. Each is from California’s Jackson Family that tell a unique story of origin and sustainability. From July 8th through September 1, 2019, guests are offered a customized wine tasting paired with the restaurant’s classic menu items, including hand-carved steaks and fresh seafood and appetizers with a flavorful twist for $28 per person with dinner.
First Friday Kokomo - First Friday of every month, 530-9pm, at Downtown Kokomo. Activities include art, music, food, local vendors, shops, entertainment, kid's activities & much more! Visit their Facebook page for monthly themes and schedule of all activities!
Kokomo Jackrabbits at Kokomo Municipal Stadium - Various days at the Kokomo Municipal Stadium. Enjoy a day at the ballpark! The Kokomo Jackrabbits baseball team are members of the summer collegiate Prospect League. Games are held late May through early August and feature fun themes and giveaways. Lawn and stadium seating available, starting at $8.
Karl Martz and the Legacy of IU Ceramics - May 4th to July 27th, 1-4pm, at the Haan Museum of Indiana Art. Martz’s influence spread throughout Indiana and beyond through the ceramics program that he established at IU in 1945, and through his students. Many of Martz’s students went on to teach at universities, and others established successful careers as independent ceramic artists. The exhibition features works by Karl Martz, faculty that taught (or still teach) in the IU Ceramics Department, and students who went on to establish successful careers in ceramics.
Summer Story Hour - Mondays, 10-11am, at the Physical Building of the Joseph Moore Museum. Join us each Monday in June and July at 10am for a special hour of stories! Each week will feature a different book about nature or science with a corresponding craft or activity. All ages are welcome and stories are chosen particularly for children in preschool - first grade.
Indianapolis Colts 2019 Training Camp - July 25 - Aug 15 at the Grand Park Sports Campus. Join us at the Indianapolis Colts 2019 Training Camp! Every day you can enjoy watching practice, giveaways, food & drink specials, interactive games, and more. Download your free tickets at www.colts.com/camp.
Southern Indiana
Wildlife Cruises on Patoka Lake - Wednesdays May through October at the Patoka Lake Marina. Not just a boat ride: cruise the second largest lake in Indiana upon a climate controlled tour boat to search for osprey, eagles, blue herons, loons and other wildlife. Two hour cruises embark EVERY WEDNESDAY at 10am beginning in May and continuing through October. Voyagers are encouraged to capture on camera baby osprey in their nests, an eagle in flight, and busy beavers as the boat passes by.
Wine Cruises on Patoka Lake - Every other Friday starting June 7th, 730-930pm, at the Patoka Lake Marina. Sip wine paired with hors d'oeuvres/desserts while enjoying the sunset on Patoka Lake on our 60 person tour boat! Enjoy 5-7 tastings of wine from a featured Indiana winery, and choose 2 glasses of your favorite to enjoy after the tasting portion. Bottles of wine available for purchase as well as additional glasses. Call (812) 685-2203 to reserve your spot today! Only $50/person or $98/couple. Visit our website to view the winery lineup.
Shrek the Musical - July 3rd - Aug 18th, 6-10pm, at the Derby Dinner Playhouse. Somebody once told me everyone’s favorite ogre is back in the hilarious and twisted adventure based on the Oscar-winning smash hit film. Follow this unlikely green hero on a life-changing journey full of romance and dozens of zany misfit characters. The perfect show for any age! Ticket price includes dinner, show, tax & parking. AAA discount available.
Evansville Otters at Bosse Field - Various days at Bosse Field. Locally owned and a member of the Frontier League, the Otters are the darlings of summer. Great ball play combined with fun promotions throughout the game guarantee an evening of fun family entertainment. To top it off, the games are played at Bosse Field, a stadium built in 1915 and the site of the filming of "A League of Their Own" in 1992. Come watch our Boys of Summer from May through August!
Floyds Knobs Farmers Market - Saturdays May through October at 400 Block Laffollette Station. Floyds Knobs Farmers Market Opening May 11 - October 26 Every Saturday from 8:30 am to 1 pm. Were an Indiana Grown Market and host a variety of Great Events throughout Season.
The Art of the Monon - April 1st to August 31st, 10am-4pm at the French Lick West Baden Museum. The Monon was Indiana’s railroad and touched every town in Orange County. See the Monon paintings of renowned railroad artist Howard Fogg and other rare Monon items.
Dubois County Bombers at League Stadium - Various days at the League Stadium. League Stadium was home to the Rockford Peaches in the hit movie A League of Their Own. The vintage signage, scoreboard, and atmosphere remain. The Bombers play in vintage-inspired uniforms - pants are knickered, stirrups are worn. The crack of a wood bat against a baseball resounds through the stadium. You may hear Who’s on First over the audio. We even have our own Peaches at the games keeping everything in the stadium rolling, while our coaches and players keep it exciting on the field.
Rock on Rising Sun - April 10th to September 30th on Main Street. Search and re-hide painted rocks hidden within the City of Rising Sun city limits. Spearheaded by a local resident, thousands of rocks are painted throughout the season for kids of all ages to find and re-hide. Participants are encouraged to paint their own creations and hide within the city limits. Photos of found rocks are asked to be uploaded to the Rock on Rising Sun
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ColdMaker’s Solve: Day 4: Grand Finale

So where are we headed today? Well as I’ve said before this is my last go at it. I think in previous attempts I’ve overcomplicated things. So this year the only real reason I’m back here is I realized I didn’t take the simplest possible path and that I owed it to myself to do that. So what is that simple path?
Recapping: WWWH - Great Falls Canyon Down - Maria’s River Canyon Too Far To Walk - 40 miles Home of Brown - Sweetgrass Hills/Mt. Brown No Place For Meek - Blackfeet Reservation No Paddle Up You Creek - Cut Bank Creek/Camp Disappointment Heavy Loads and Water High - Rocky Mountains/Glacier National Park Blaze - ?
So what did I miss here? I’m sure you noticed it. It’s the simplicity I referred to above. The End Is Ever Drawing Nigh.
I realized last winter that maybe my solution still made sense but I hadn’t looked to the most obvious possibility. As others have pointed out draw nigh means “go left” for a horseman. This I had known previously as it was part of my rationale for my solve’s movement right to left from HoB/Meek to Cut Bank. But I began to wonder if in reality Fenn just meant keep going left all the way until you draw to an end i.e. following Cut Bank creek until you eventually hit water high.
So that’s what we are doing today. Following Cut Bank Creek into Cut Bank Valley as far as we can go. And this location is above 5000 ft by the way.
For those of you following on google maps follow the north fork of the Cut Bank all the way into GNP. You’ll see a long dirt road and a primitive campground and a parking lot. Something Fenn could have easily driven to. Then you’ll see the start of a trail that heads up, ultimately to Triple Divide peak, the Crown of the Continent.
So where specifically are we looking?
  1. In the creek (or below the high water line) at the boundary between the Blackfoot reservation and GNP. This spot is a couple hundred feet off the dirt road. I like this spot as it may be a bit of a legal no man’s land - not GNP, not Blackfoot reservation, accessible by Montana’s stream access laws. It’s possible jurisdiction might fall to the State of Montana.
In this scenario my blaze would be this border that runs between the reservation and GNP (something that factored into my earlier failed solves). You can see what I am talking about on google earth. The Forrest Service or like entity maintains this boundary which is 5-10 feet wide and runs dozens of miles or more.
  1. We are just going to walk the trail for a mile or so and look for interesting blazes on trees. If we see anything we will investigate. This is Fenn’s “you need BOTG at the end to complete the solve” approach.
  2. Another possibility is the Blaze is the trail itself and you walk up to a point where you have a great view (marvel gaze) and dawdle around a bit until you spot the treasure.
It’s this last bit that I am most excited about. The reason is that AFTER I decided to do this jaunt up CutBank creek I began researching whether there was anything interesting about this part of the park. Turns out yes. To my amazement I found that less than a mile from the parking lot is another one of the “lost chalet” sites. The Cut Bank Chalets. Abandoned in late 30’s and early 40’s. Torn down in 1949. Zero trace left. A main reason people came to Cut Bank Chalets? Get this ... it was a fisherman’s paradise. See the postcard image here. What’s cut out of this image (I have a copy of the original postcard) is a little square box near the stream ... a spot definitely worth checking out. So in my imagination I see a 13 year old Fenn having abandoned chalets all to himself with incredible fishing. Sounds like a place I might like to die at.
So in any event that’s where we are headed today, right now actually. I forgot to add if we don’t find the treasure we plan on fishing this forgotten paradise for a few hours. Should be fun.
If I don’t post tonight I think it’s safe to assume we didn’t find anything and are at the Browning casino. I will post at a later date and give you a dump of all my other research findings. Thanks for coming with me!
-ColdMaker
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Happening in Indiana: June 24th - 30th

All my information comes from VisitIndiana so the list is not 100% comprehensive. If you know of anything that's missing, please post and share with everyone! If you've ever been to any of these events, or if you go this week, please share your experiences
Also be sure to visit the city-specific subreddits
This Week Only
Northwest Indiana
Lakeside Lavender and Herb Annual Lavender Festival - Jun 29-30, 10am-5pm, at Lakeside Lavender and Herbs, 273 W Johnson Rd. Each year we open the field at the peak of its bloom for visitors to pick a fresh bundle of lavender or just enjoy the purple. With approximately 3,500 plants, the sweet smell of lavender fills the air. Artisan vendors, music, lavender crafting and a full complement of our handcrafted, small batch lavender and/or herbal products (did someone say lavender ice cream?) make this a must-do event for all ages.
ArtBash - Jun 29 at the Blue Chip Casino Hotel. Help make art accessible to all at LCA's premier fundraising event of the year! Bid by text during the auction, buy a chance to win original artworks, dance the night away and much more. All proceeds benefit LCA exhibitions and children's programs.
2019 US Senior Open - Jun 24-30 at The Warren Golf Course at Notre Dame University. The U.S. Senior Open Championship started "as a result of the remarkable growth in senior golf, both at the professional and amateur levels." The U.S. Senior Open Championship has continued to be contested at notable sites around the country. 2019' event at the Warren Course at Notre Dame, will be the first U.S. Senior Open contested on a university golf course and the first on a public course
St. Joseph County 4-H Fair - Jun 29 - Jul 7 at the St. Joseph County 4-H Fairgrounds. Celebrating Our Annual Fair! Live music, free daily entertainment, carnival rides, commercial and craft vendors, 4-H exhibits and shows, antique tractors, monster trucks, demolition derby, NTPA tractor pulls, and rodeo. Fireworks.
Valparaiso/Porter County Garden Walk - Jun 29, 9am-4pm, at the Private Gardens. Visit a great selection of beautiful local gardens on Northwest Indiana's premier garden tour sponsored by Porter County Master Gardeners Assn. & Purdue Extension - Master Gardeners answer questions & explain plantings at numerous select private gardens. 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. $8 presale; $10 day of Walk.For additional information and ticket sales info : 219-465-3555 or www.pcgarden.info
Northeast Indiana
Park-inn Movies: Jaws - Jun 28, 930-1130pm, at Potawatomi Inn. Bring your swimsuit and floaties to the beach overlooking Lake James. Our movie screen will be facing Lake James so you can float and watch the movie. Admission is free to Inn Guests, Campground Guests and with paid admission to Pokagon State Park. (Weather Permitting).
International Jugglers Association Festival - Jun 24-30 at the Embassy Theatre. Join us at the 2019 IJA Festival for a week of incredible juggling, workshops, shows, competitions and memories in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Stay tuned for regular updates on performers, registration, special events and unexpected surprises! Founded in 1947, the IJA is excited to be celebrating our 72nd Annual Festival in the delightful city of Fort Wayne, Indiana. See you there!
Greekfest - Jun 27-30 at Headwaters Park. Come celebrate the Greek Festival with us and enjoy a large variety of Greek cuisine and entertainment including live music, dancing and other activities each day. Experience our philoxenia (hospitality) and become "Greek" for one, two, three or even four days at the Fort Wayne Greek Fest! OPA! and Kalos orisate! (Welcome!)
41st Annual Artlink Members’ Showcase - Jun 28, 5-8pm, at Artlink (300 E Main St). Artlink is pleased to present the 41st Annual Members’ Showcase, celebrating the individual artists that help make Artlink possible through their continual member support of the organization for over forty years. This exhibition features artists working in all mediums at all stages of their artistic careers. The Members’ Showcase provides immediate access to a gallery exhibition for our artist members. Please join us at our opening reception on Friday, June 28 from 5-8pm. This exhibition will be on view through August 2, 2019.
Buskerfest - Jun 29, 4-10pm, at Downtown Fort Wayne. Bigger & Better than Ever! BuskerFest, Presented by Lutheran Health Network and your Downtown Improvement District. Downtown’s celebration of the street performer, BuskerFest will feature fantastic local, regional and national acts, free admission and an experience like no other! Buskers are the highlight of BuskerFest with great performers scheduled throughout the event. Add an eclectic mix of random and unplanned performances and you have an amazing day of talent, originality, novelty and creativity from around the region. Look for living statues, chalk artists, aerialists, fire dancers, caricature artists, magicians, jugglers, mimes, painters, musicians, balloon artists and more. The Downtown Improvement District encourages patrons to tip buskers for their efforts.
Dixie Melody Boys - Jun 27, 7-9pm, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Dixie Melody Boys - (June 27, 2019) Showtime: 7:00pm | Doors Open: 6:30pm Prices: Tickets Only - $19.95 | Dinner and Theater - $37.95
Jeff Parker - Jun 28, 7-9pm, at the Blue Gate Theatre. Showtime: 7:00pm | Doors Open: 6:30pm Prices: Tickets Only - $24.95 | Dinner and Theater - $42.95
Central Indiana
Indiana Fiddlers' Gathering - Jun 28-30 at the Tippecanoe Battlefield. Three-day acoustic music festival featuring the best in old time folk, swing, and Celtic music.
Family FunDay at the Farmers Market - Jun 29, 10am-1pm, at the Cloverdale Farmers Market. Ready to enjoy some fun? Three-legged races, sack races, egg in a spoon race, water balloon toss, watermelon eating contest, local storyteller and much more. The vendors at the market will be there to join in on the fun as well! Don't worry if you think it will be too hot we will have a tent to cool off in and some free water!
Gas City Concerts in the Park Presents Sidewalk Prophets - Jun 25, 7pm, at Gas City Park. This is a FREE concert brought to you by the Gas City Concerts in the Park committee.
Stranger Things Painting Party - Jun 28, 6-8pm, at uPaint Pottery Studio, 3113 W Smith Valley Rd, Suite D. Join us with your friends for a fun evening of trivia, refreshments and painting! Regular studio pricing applies. Grab a group of friends and join us for a night of fun!
Freedom Festival - Jun 29, 12pm-1030pm, at Craig Park. As Greenwood’s marquee community event, Freedom Festival draws more than 50,000 people to Craig Park every summer to celebrate the American Spirit. Held on the last Saturday in June, the festivities include a parade, local food, beer and craft vendors, and a kids zone. Indiana's best fireworks show concludes the evening.
89th annual Marion County Fair - Jun 21-30, 5-11pm, at the Marion County Fairgrounds. The ?Marion County Fair is back for its 89th year and invites fairgoers to enjoy a wide variety of special features, events, acts and more! The 2019 fair showcases different attractions including fair food, Dino-ROAR (interactive & educational dinosaur show & exhibit), pageants, talent shows, First Bite Fishing Tank, Grandstands events, Elite Performance K9 Frisbee Dogs, Bear Hollow Chainsaw Wood Carvers, Princesses & Superheroes, a petting zoo and much more! ?Hundreds of Marion County youth showcase their talents through 4-H to celebrate Marion County’s agricultural heritage in categories including fashion, photography, crafts, and animals.
Festival Dia De La Familia - Jun 30, 12-11pm, at Military Park, 601 W New York St. Welcome to FAMILIA FEST! Indiana's largest recurring annual festival celebrating the best in Latin Foods, Music, and Culture! The event is Family Friendly and 100% FREE admission for all! Live Music stage featuring top local, regional, and national Latin acts throughout the day. Food vendors selling traditional foods and delicious treats from Mexico, Honduras, Guatemala, Columbia, and many other Latin regions! A special "Kids Area" with fun games, bounce houses, climbing wall, and much more! And many other vendors selling fun toys, games, face-painting, and much more. Beer garden featuring the best Mexican beers, for adults.
Tuesday on the Trail Nature Walk - Jun 25, 6-7pm, at the Haan Museum of Indiana Art. Get a closer look at nature as a guide leads you on an educational walk along our Nature Trail. The trail is about a mile long loop in the Museum’s three acre woods making it feel very much like a wilderness experience in the middle of town. Meet at the Nature Trail Entrance located at the south side of the Carriage house just off the parking lot. Fee: FREE
Trippin Billies (Dave Matthews Tribute Band) - Jun 29, 5-9pm, at the Cedar Creek Winery. Join Cedar Creek Winery, Brewery and Distillery for their popular Drink at the Creek Concert Series. The June 29th Drink at the Creek Concert kicks off with Combo Nation at 5 pm. Trippin Billies, a Dave Matthews tribute band, takes the stage at 7 pm. Bringing fans the music of The Dave Matthews Band for close to twenty years, Trippin’ Billies has become the gold standard for tribute bands. Based out of Chicago, the Billies have toured extensively throughout the U.S. performing at many of the same theaters Dave himself once graced. Tickets are $10 per person; kids ages 12 and under are FREE.
Stranger Things Painting Party - Jun 28, 6-8pm, at uPaint Pottery Studio, 1820 East Main St. oin us with your friends for a fun evening of trivia, refreshments and painting! Regular studio pricing applies. Grab a group of friends and join us for a night of fun!
Jay County Truck, Tractor & Farm Tractor Pull - Jun 29, 4-1030pm, at the Jay County Fairgrounds. Entry Sign-in & Scales Begins at 4:30 pm • Pulling Begins 6 pm, Grand Stands Admission is FREE • $10 per Adult pit pass • Drivers FREE with Paid Class Entry • $5 per Child pit pass for kids aged 6-12 • Free pit pass for kids aged 6 and under Delicious BBQ Food Concessions available on site to enjoy!
Richmond Shakespeare Festival - Jun 21 - Jul 6, at Whitewater Gorge Park. Richmond Shakespeare Festival announces its 2019 Season featuring Hamlet and The Tempest as a dynamic pairing in rotating repertory, the productions will be created by a brilliant cast and crew of AEA and non-AEA professionals, college-age interns, and volunteers sourced from as nearby as Richmond, and Indianapolis, and as far away as Utah, Maine and New York. Leading this company is Producing Artistic Director, Patrick Flick, also Executive Director of the international Shakespeare Theatre Association. Come see some of the only Shakespeare being produced right here in beautiful Wayne County.
Space Exploration Summer Camp - Jun 24-28 at the Joseph Moore Museum. Join us for a fun week of hands-on activities, fun games, and planetarium exploration! Budding astronauts will learn about rockets, the planets, experience a way to safely look at the sun, and more. Camp runs June 24th - 28th from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm. The camp is designed for kids entering kindergarten through 2nd grade. The camp fee is $120/child for the week.
Larry Cat in Space Movie - Jun 29-30, 1-4pm, at Earlham College Joseph Moore Museum. "Take off on a lunar adventure with the curious stowaway cat Larry! This 30-minute full dome planetarium film will take you on an adventure through space to learn about our moon. The film is fun for children of all ages, especially kids 3-6 years old. Tickets are $5/person. "
Southern Indiana
Limestone Heritage Festival - Jun 28-29 at Downtown Bedford. Makes me think of this song
Afternoon Dessert Cruise on Patoka Lake - Jun 30, 2-4pm, at Patoka Lake Marina. An afternoon on the lake aboard our climate controlled tour boat, the Patoka Pride, with desserts and a cash bar is a perfect way to end the month of June. Don't let the summer pass by without getting out on the water and enjoying time with friends or family. Cruise sets sail at 2p from Patoka Lake Marina for two hours. Cost is $30/person and this event is family friendly. Ticket includes dessert and two-hour cruise. Beverages are available for purchase at the bar on the boat.
The Capitol Ball - Jun 29, 7-10pm, at Corydon Capitol State Historic Site. If you've ever want to dance like they do in Jane Austen movies or perhaps find your Mr. Darcy, this is the event for you! The Capitol Ball is an elegant evening of period dancing. You'll learn dances that were popular in early America during the time Corydon was the state capitol of Indiana (1816-1825). No dance experience or talent is necessary...there will be a dance caller telling you the moves and each dance is taught beforehand. The Ball features live music by Celtic band Keltricity and delicious food and drinks. Tickets are $15/person or $25/couple (bring a friend and save!). Historic dress is encouraged but not required. Free dance practice sessions will be held in weeks leading up to the ball for those wishing for some extra practice before the Ball.
Sunday Concert Series: The Rigby's - Jun 30, 130-530pm, at Turtle Run Winery. Join us for the Rigby's, perhaps the best Beatles dedication band out there. Sure, they'll mix in a little of Paul, Ringo, George and the other Beatles singles. These guys really make you think the Beatles are up there strumming their guitars. They are really, really good and very authentic! Our concerts are free and they are family friendly
Here I Grew Up (World Premiere Musical) - Jun 28-29, 7pm, at the Lincoln Amphitheatre. Here I Grew Up, a brand new original musical production, celebrates Abraham Lincoln and the community that helped shape his character. This honest and emotionally -charged story of Lincoln’s time in southern Indiana honors the pioneers who played an integral part in his formative years, helping to nurture his work ethic and desire to learn. With all new songs, lively dances, and a unique perspective on Lincoln’s life, Here I Grew Up is certain to entertain your whole family!
Park-inn Movies: A Wrinkle in Time - Jun 28, 930-1130pm, at the Clifty Inn. Bring your blanket to the lawn overlooking the Ohio River (behind Clifty Inn). Admission is free to Inn Guests, Campground Guests and with paid admission to Clifty Falls State Park. (Weather Permitting).
Cheers to Pallet Painting - Jun 29, 6-730pm, at the West Baden Springs Hotel. Unwind with a few glasses of wine and unlock your artistic side as an experienced artist works with you to craft a unique creation. Hand-crafted pallets are the perfect rustic accent to any home décor, and you’ll have your own pallet to take home and display — decorated just as you like it.
ONGOING EVENTS
Northwest Indiana
Chesterton's European Market - Saturdays May through October at Third St and Broadway, Downtown Chesterton. An outdoor family/artisanal market held in historic downtown Chesterton from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Gary Southshore Railcats at U.S. Steel Yard - Various days at US Steel Yard. A day at U.S. Steel yard is non-stop fun, and that's even without the baseball! The RailCats promise a wide array of laugh-out-loud between inning entertainment, great giveaways , jaw-dropping fireworks and a family-first, kid-friendly atmosphere!
Miller Woods Hike Sundays - Every Sunday at Miller Woods. The hike starts at the National Lakeshore's Paul H. Douglas Center and travels through varied habitats including rare and beautiful black oak savanna and offers incredible views of Lake Michigan and Chicago. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water and insect repellent. This hike is offered every Sunday from 1:30 to 3:30pm.
Summer Sundown Music Series - Sundays May through August. Bring the lawn chairs or blankets and enjoy Sunday evenings listening to a different musical artist each week. Each Sunday evening you will find yourself at a different park with new musical artist. Check online to see where and who will be appearing!
Michigan City Municipal Band Concerts - Thursdays in June, July, and August, at the Washington Park Guy Foreman Amphitheater. Experience free live musical performances under the stars near the shores of Lake Michigan in Washington Park. Seating available or bring your own chair. June-August, Thursdays 7:30pm.
Market on the Square - Fridays June through August, 3-9pm, at Founders Square. There will be over 20 vendors selling unique crafts, fresh produce, honey, flowers, breads and jams. Plus local food vendors selling food. Bands from the region will begin at 6. Then to top off the evening we will have a family movie at dusk.
Keepers of the Fire: The Pokagon Band of Potawatomi - April 2019 to January 2020 at The History Museum. The rich history, culture, and art of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi is shared in this vibrant exhibit about the thriving community. Through interviews and oral histories, sculpture and beadwork, art and artifacts, the exhibit immerses visitors in the traditions and teachings of the Pokagon Band.
South Bend Cubs at Four Winds Field - Various days at Four Winds Field. The South Bend Cubs are the Class A minor league affiliate of the World Series Champion Chicago Cubs. Over the past 30 seasons, the team has won five Midwest League titles and has captured 12 division titles. In 2015 the team was named Ballpark Digest's Team of the Year and received the John H. Johnson President's Award, the highest award in minor league baseball.
The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Show - May 4th 2019 to May 2nd 2020, 6-9pm, at the DoubleTree by Hilton. America’s largest interactive murder mystery dinner show! The Dinner Detective provides a hilarious evening of murder mystery, a 4-course meal, and a prize package for the top sleuth. Just beware, the killer might be sitting right next to you!
Northeast Indiana
Fort Wayne TinCaps at Parkview Field - Various days at Parkview Field. The TinCaps are entering their 10th season at Parkview Field, which has been rated as Minor League Baseball's No. 1 Ballpark Experience four consecutive years.
Faces of Middlebury - May 17th to October 4th throughout Middlebury. Grab your cameras and the map to locate each “face of Middlebury” and insert your face for the perfect picture. Free maps are available at local businesses and organizations. Post your pics on Middlebury Then & Now’s Facebook page or on Instagram using #facesofmiddlebury. Can you find all of them, up to 30 "faces"?
Gangsters, Saloons and Buggies on Roofs Guided Tour - May 29th to September 25th at the Downtown Middlebury library. You wouldn't know Middlebury had a rough-and-tumble past, but behind today's modern facades lie tales of small-town mischief, hoods on the lam and possible mysterious passageways. Get the inside story and secrets from a local with this tour of downtown. Tours are offered at 10am every Wednesday and at 630pm the first Tuesday of each month. Walking tour is approximately 1 hour. Allow time after the tour to visit the unique shops and restaurants in the area. $5 Group tours are available by advanced reservation (call 574.825.5601)
Giant Toadstools and the World's Fair Guided Walking Tour - May 30th to September 26th at the Krider World's Fair Garden. Enjoy a guided tour through living history! The Krider family of Middlebury once captured the imagination of the world. This tour of the garden that bears their name opens a window to the family's nursery at the height of its creative powers. The beauty will take your breath away, just as it did at the Chicago World's Fair in 1933. Tours are offered at 10am every Thursday and at 630pm the first Tuesday of each month. Walking tour is approximately 1 hour. Allow time after the tour to visit the museum, unique shops and restaurants in the area. $5 Group tours are available by advanced reservation (call 574.825.5601)
A Simple Sanctuary, the new musical - March 28th to October 31st at the Blue Gate Theatre. She prayed the day would never come, but when her past comes calling, Melissa James has no choice but to flee. Pursued and living on the run, she finds desperate sanctuary and surprising friendship in Amish country. Part suspense, part romance, A Simple Sanctuary is a compelling story of love tested, the cost of freedom, and the solace found in true community.
Shipshewana Flea Market - Tuesdays and Wednesdays from May through September, 8am-4pm, at the Shipshewana Auction. Nearly 700 open-air booths on 40 acres await you at the Midwest’s Largest Flea Market. Food courts, restrooms, scooter rentals and rest areas are on site. Open rain or shine. Also open for Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, and new weekend markets on August 16-17 (MotheDaughter Days). Antique Auctions are every Wednesday inside the Antique & Miscellaneous building.
Central Indiana
Kroger Symphony on the Prairie - Saturdays and Sundays at Conner Prairie. The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra's summer series provides music from classical, pop, and rock genres from mid-June through Labor Day weekend. See performance schedule online indianapolissymphony.org
Hot Wheels: Race to Win - May 18th to July 28th at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines and hold on tight as we open our Hot Wheels: Race to Win exhibit celebrating speed, safety, design, and power. Get revved up for the special performances, activities, and the occasional pit stop.
Treasures of Ancient Greece exhibit - Jun 15 to Jan 5 at The Childrens Museum of Indianapolis. This once-in-a-lifetime immersive exhibition brings to Indianapolis more than 150 ancient objects and artifacts, many of which have never been seen outside of Greece. The ancient Greeks revered the human body, and many of the depictions are nude. Featured are bronze and marble statues, gold jewelry and funerary objects, exquisite pottery, artifacts of the world’s first democracy, and an extraordinary replica of the Antikythera Mechanism, known as the world’s first computer.
Mind Tripping Show - March 1st to December 28th, 8:30-10PM at the Hilton Indianapolis Hotel and Suites. Mind Tripping: a Comedy with a Psychological Twist is an interactive show by Christian & Katalina, the #1 Husband and Wife Comedy Mind Reading Act in the Nation. Be a part of a mind-bending, reality-twisting interactive theatrical show. Think Candid Camera meets the Twilight Zone. Be prepared to have your perceptions challenged and your expectations turned upside down
Naturally Inspired Art Exhibition - May 24th to August 21st at The Indianapolis Zoo. After the paintings have dried and been professionally framed by The Great Frame Up Downtown, they are displayed for the summer in the Schaefer Rotunda at White River Gardens. Plus, you also get to enjoy the works of some of our more artistically inclined animals. Who knows — you may see a penguin Picasso, a walrus Warhol, an elephant Escher and many others! The Naturally Inspired Art Show presented by The Great Frame Up Downtown is included with Zoo admission.
Nickelodeon’s PAW Patrol Adventure Play - February 23 to July 28th at The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. The hero pups of Adventure Bay are coming to The Children’s Museum, and they need your help. It’s time to run some rescue missions, as we work together to overcome challenges and help everyone in Adventure Bay. Enter the Lookout. Save the Day in Adventure Bay. Be a Helping Hero on Jake’s Mountain.
The National Bank of Indianapolis Summer Nights Film Series - Various days June-August, at The Amphitheater. You can watch movies under the stars every weekend at Newfields. Doors open at 7 pm, when you can enjoy a picnic dinner, music, and activities, followed by that night’s movie, which will begin when twilight turns to night (usually 9:30 pm). Over the summer, over 20 movies will be shown—everything from black-and-white classics to modern blockbusters. All you need is a picnic (with non-alcoholic beverages only), chairs (for the back row of each tier), and blankets (in case the chair row is full). You will also want sunscreen and bugspray. No alcohol, pets, candles taller than 12 inches, or knives permitted. And if you want to travel light with just a chair and blanket, concessions will be available to purchase. Check out discovernewfields.org/summer-nights-2019 to see available films and to purchase tickets once they are available.
Zoolapalooza Concert Series - Fridays in June and July, 530-830pm, at the Indianapolis Zoo. Under the Bicentennial Pavilion, this incredibly fun night out is a great way to kick off summer weekends on Friday evenings with terrific live music. Concerts are free for members and included with Zoo admission, so you can play all day and dance all night! Seating under the Bicentennial Pavilion includes open tables on a first-come, first-serve basis
First Friday Kokomo - First Friday of every month, 530-9pm, at Downtown Kokomo. Activities include art, music, food, local vendors, shops, entertainment, kid's activities & much more! Visit their Facebook page for monthly themes and schedule of all activities!
Kokomo Jackrabbits at Kokomo Municipal Stadium - Various days at the Kokomo Municipal Stadium. Enjoy a day at the ballpark! The Kokomo Jackrabbits baseball team are members of the summer collegiate Prospect League. Games are held late May through early August and feature fun themes and giveaways. Lawn and stadium seating available, starting at $8.
Kokomo Free Summer Concert Series - Fridays in June, 7-10pm, at the Kokomo Arts Pavilion in Foster Park. Kokomo's Free Summer Concert Series features nationally-known bands and musicians. All concerts are free! Many concerts will also feature food vendors and kid's activities in addition to great live music! Outdoor seating; bring lawn chairs. Visit website to see full list of bands and concerts. June 22 - HOG Fest featuring Allman Betts Band
Karl Martz and the Legacy of IU Ceramics - May 4th to July 27th, 1-4pm, at the Haan Museum of Indiana Art. Martz’s influence spread throughout Indiana and beyond through the ceramics program that he established at IU in 1945, and through his students. Many of Martz’s students went on to teach at universities, and others established successful careers as independent ceramic artists. The exhibition features works by Karl Martz, faculty that taught (or still teach) in the IU Ceramics Department, and students who went on to establish successful careers in ceramics.
Summer Story Hour - Mondays, 10-11am, at the Physical Building of the Joseph Moore Museum. Join us each Monday in June and July at 10am for a special hour of stories! Each week will feature a different book about nature or science with a corresponding craft or activity. All ages are welcome and stories are chosen particularly for children in preschool - first grade.
Southern Indiana
Wildlife Cruises on Patoka Lake - Wednesdays May through October at the Patoka Lake Marina. Not just a boat ride: cruise the second largest lake in Indiana upon a climate controlled tour boat to search for osprey, eagles, blue herons, loons and other wildlife. Two hour cruises embark EVERY WEDNESDAY at 10am beginning in May and continuing through October. Voyagers are encouraged to capture on camera baby osprey in their nests, an eagle in flight, and busy beavers as the boat passes by.
Wine Cruises on Patoka Lake - Every other Friday starting June 7th, 730-930pm, at the Patoka Lake Marina. Sip wine paired with hors d'oeuvres/desserts while enjoying the sunset on Patoka Lake on our 60 person tour boat! Enjoy 5-7 tastings of wine from a featured Indiana winery, and choose 2 glasses of your favorite to enjoy after the tasting portion. Bottles of wine available for purchase as well as additional glasses. Call (812) 685-2203 to reserve your spot today! Only $50/person or $98/couple. Visit our website to view the winery lineup.
Snow White and the Prince - May 25th to June 29th, at 9am, at The Derby Dinner Playhouse. Children's Musical Theatre suitable for ages 3 to 12. Join Snow White on a comical adventure with her prince, and all seven of those silly dwarves, in this vibrant new musical. A clever re-telling of the classic fairy tale that is sure to please even the most devoted Disney fans! Price: Breakfast – $17.00; Lunch – $22.00 Breakfast 9:00 A.M. Show 10:00 A.M. Lunch 12:00 P.M. Show 1:15 P.M.
The Savannah Sipping Society - May 22nd to June 30th, 6-10pm, at the Derby Dinner Playhouse. From the authors of “The Dixie Swim Club” comes a laugh-a-minute comedy about four Southern women, all needing to escape their day-to-day routines, drawn together by fate—and an impromptu happy hour. Ticket price includes dinner, show, tax & parking. AAA discount available.
Floyds Knobs Farmers Market - Saturdays May through October at 400 Block Laffollette Station. Floyds Knobs Farmers Market Opening May 11 - October 26 Every Saturday from 8:30 am to 1 pm. Were an Indiana Grown Market and host a variety of Great Events throughout Season.
The Art of the Monon - April 1st to August 31st, 10am-4pm at the French Lick West Baden Museum. The Monon was Indiana’s railroad and touched every town in Orange County. See the Monon paintings of renowned railroad artist Howard Fogg and other rare Monon items.
Dubois County Bombers at League Stadium - Various days at the League Stadium. League Stadium was home to the Rockford Peaches in the hit movie A League of Their Own. The vintage signage, scoreboard, and atmosphere remain. The Bombers play in vintage-inspired uniforms - pants are knickered, stirrups are worn. The crack of a wood bat against a baseball resounds through the stadium. You may hear Who’s on First over the audio. We even have our own Peaches at the games keeping everything in the stadium rolling, while our coaches and players keep it exciting on the field.
Rock on Rising Sun - April 10th to September 30th on Main Street. Search and re-hide painted rocks hidden within the City of Rising Sun city limits. Spearheaded by a local resident, thousands of rocks are painted throughout the season for kids of all ages to find and re-hide. Participants are encouraged to paint their own creations and hide within the city limits. Photos of found rocks are asked to be uploaded to the Rock on Rising Sun Facebook page.
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Onekahokwe

My son has reached the age at which he can enjoy my stories. By now, his friends have gathered that I am “the guy” who wrote those books and Creepypastas that they have read and listened to on YouTube. Sometimes, when they are over the house, we’ll sit out around a bonfire in the backyard and share stories. Each time we do, it never fails that someone asks “Yeah, but do you have any true stories?”
True? Are you insinuating that my stories aren’t true? Well, for the most part they are not. There are a few that are mostly true, or based on true events; but I recently remembered one that is entirely true, and it still gives me the shivers. Let me digress a bit and properly set the background.
There are three types of campers. The first are the “glampers,” who drive around in their two-hundred-thousand dollar motor homes with king sized beds, satellite TV and internet access, and more televisions than are in my entire house. Then are the “campers,” who rent lots at campgrounds or state parks and sleep on the ground in tents telling themselves that, unlike the glampers, they are really roughing it. And that leaves the stone agers. My friends and I fall in that last category.
Our idea of camping was to drive out to the wilderness, pull off the side of the road, stuff as much as we could into our backpacks, and take off on foot up into the mountains. Give me a sleeping bag, a gun, a bottle of cheap whiskey, and a can of beans and I’m set for the weekend. That is how my friends and I spent most of our summer weekends in our younger years.
Growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, the nearest place that we could find actual wilderness included a four hour drive to the foothills of the Appalachians in the Allegheny National forest. We would hit I- 90 right after work on Friday and drive east along the great lakes until we reached the outskirts of the forest, then plunge south into its heart. Our destination was the little town of Red House near the Seneca Nation Indian Reservation. It was a long, boring drive – especially after a hard day’s work – but our excitement would begin to grow when we spotted the first familiar landmark. Driving along the Allegheny River highway, it was impossible to miss the Kinzua Dam. Built for flood control and used to generate hydroelectric power, the one-hundred-eighty foot high concrete structure was massive and visible from miles away. It was, and still is, the largest dam east of the Mississippi River.
Passing the dam, we would go over a long bridge that crossed the man-made Allegheny Reservoir that had come to be known as Lake Perfidy – an interesting and fitting name, as you will soon find out. Red House was not far beyond that. On this particular occasion, our party consisted of myself and two friends: Mike and Rob. We reached an abandoned gas station – our “base camp” – shortly after nine o’clock. As usual, we packed our things and begin climbing into the Appalachian foothills. We were in a hurry to get to one of our favorite spots as soon as possible. It was freezing cold, even though it was the middle of August, and we still needed to locate some dry wood for a campfire.
Finding cut logs and kindling was never a problem, as that part of the forest underwent a constant process of selective logging. Trees were thinned out rather than clear-cut, allowing the logging companies to get their take while leaving a sustainable forest to repair itself. There was always some waste left over, and as soon as we dropped our packs and sleeping rolls, we went off hunting for chunks of wood. Another advantage of having the logging companies working out there was the network of primitive logging roads that they left behind. Narrow, flat, and paved with pressed sawdust and wood chips, the roads made great trails to follow. Theoretically, we could have used them to drive further up the mountain but a ranger had long ago warned us that they were dangerous. They twisted and turned without warning, were sometimes blocked by fallen trees, and if the weather was wet they tended to slide out from beneath your vehicle, potentially leaving you hanging from a mountain ledge. In addition to that, he told us stories about the local drunks who would use the roads at night to get from the bars in town out to their homes in order to avoid using surface roads, where they might run into the sheriff. Two vehicles trying to negotiate the same road, in opposite directions, with (at least) one drunk operator was a recipe for disaster.
Friday night was uneventful. We gathered some wood, got a fire started and laid out our sleeping rolls. We sat around the fire for an hour or so passing around a bottle of Echo Springs and talking about our plans for Saturday and then, exhausted, hit the hay.
Okay, the one downside of sleeping under the stars is the potential to wake up half-submerged in a puddle of water. Sure enough, it had rained overnight. Not enough of a downpour to wake any of us up, but enough to thoroughly soak our campsite. The coals from the previous evening’s fire were still sizzling. My sleeping bag, and my clothes, were soaked. First order of business was to get a roaring fire going and try to dry out and warm up. That done, we decided to head back to the truck and make a run for the reservation. Surely, we thought, there must be some type of general store where we could buy some tarps so that we would be prepared in case more rain should come on Saturday.
Although we had camped near the reservation for years, we had never actually been to the reservation. Driving in, we were all a bit anxious. We did not know what to expect. We had heard that the natives didn’t hold any fond feelings for “the white man.” I suppose that we half expected to find teepees and wigwams but instead found trailer parks and bingo halls. It was a thoroughly depressing place. Squalid living conditions and poverty oozed from every pore of the place. Maybe the white man really did screw these people over. They could always leave, though, right? Make their way out in the real world? I suppose it’s not that simple and I will never truly be able to understand. In our modern age, a reservation is just a place where a tribe has sovereignty to run their own government and enforce their own laws, even if contained entirely within another state. Hence, the bingo halls and casinos, which would be taxable or outlawed in the surrounding area. Of course, the prospect of gambling was not helping out the Seneca people. Big spenders did not often flock to little towns in the middle of nowhere.
We weren’t having much luck finding anything other than what I just described when we stumbled across an old man sitting out in front of one of the bingo halls. Tanned, high-cheeked, and sharp featured, the man was obviously an Indian – an Iroquois, actually. He was also clearly drunk. If we couldn’t tell by looking at him (which we could) then it was readily apparent by smelling him from ten feet away. Of course, we had heard the old clichés about lazy Indians living off the government’s teat while they spent their days lying around drinking. That isn’t really the case, though. In fact, this guy was just an alcoholic, plain and simple. He could just as easily have been a white, black, or Asian man sitting in the doorway of an abandoned building in downtown Cleveland.
Mike rolled down his window and called out to the man. “Hey dude! Is there a hardware store or something around here?”
The old Indian looked up and tried to focus on our truck. “Huh? What are you looking for?”
“A place we can buy some supplies. We’re looking for some canvas tarps – you know, to keep the rain off.”
“Oh,” the Indian nodded, “Campers, eh? If I were you I would count my blessings and just go home.”
“Not an option, man.”
“Let me think, then.”
We parked and got out of the truck. You could almost see the gears grinding away in the guy’s head. “Nope,” he finally said, “Can’t help you. But you should really leave. Full moon tonight.”
“We’re not the superstitious type, man.”
“Not superstition,” the Indian said shaking his head vigorously. “Fact. It is very dangerous for you to be here. Onekahokwe comes, if not tonight then tomorrow for sure.”
“Oh-ne what?”
“Onekahokwe.” He sounded it out as oh-NEEK-ah HOCK-way. “The water man.” It was obvious that he was itching to tell us the legend, and we had nothing else to do, so we sat down on the sidewalk next to him and he began speaking.
“In 1796, Pennsylvania gave Seneca Warchief Cornplanter fifteen-thousand acres of land in this valley as thanks for his support as protector of American families settling in the Allegheny River valley. In what would become the oldest treaty between the Indians and the whites, General George Washington granted the land to the Seneca tribe forever.
“The white man has a funny idea of forever, though. In 1965 they built the dam. It flooded the river valley, covering our ancestral land. Our homes, our farmland, the graves of our families. All of it, hundreds of feet below water. Our tribal leaders begged the government to stop the building of the dam, but in 1960 the president of the United States broke the longest standing treaty with Native Americans that ever existing. They claimed to have relocated our burial grounds further up the hillside but we do not believe them. Many of the graves remained, including that of Chief Cornplanter himself.
“The Seneca people still consider it a vile act of desecration. The whites simply referred to the man-made lake as the Allegheny Reservoir, but to the Seneca it has always been called Lake Perfidy – as a reminder of the treachery and deceit visited upon us by the U.S. government.”
Rob raised his eyebrows. “So where does aqua-man play into all of this?”
“Dude,” I interjected, “Have some respect. Can’t you see that he’s serious?”
The old Indian raised his hands, as if in surrender. “No, no. He is right to ask. That is the only way to understand.” He turned to face Rob. “The park rangers try to keep it secret, but divers inspecting the dam encountered a terrifying creature. It was ugly, fierce, and so threatening that they will only dive in cages now. We believe that was Onekahokwe. He protects our ancestors’ remains from being despoiled even more than they already have.”
“That’s just a rumor, though, right.” I didn’t know if Rob was making a statement or asking a question.
“No. It is the truth.”
I’ll admit that the hairs on the back of my neck were raised, but I still felt relieved. “Well, even if it was it won’t be a problem for us. We don’t plan on doing any swimming.”
“Does not matter.” The old Indian shook his head. “When there is a full moon, Onekahokwe walks on land. He comes for his sacrifice and to be worshipped. It would be best if you did not meet him.”
“Walks on land, eh?” Rob slapped his knees and stood up. “Well, I think we’re done here! Thanks for the story, man. I think we’ll take our chances, though.”
We all laughed nervously and then left the Indian to go back to the bottle that he had been hiding behind his back. We never did find any tarps, but (not surprisingly) the old man was able to direct us to a duty-free liquor store where we could replenish our supply of whiskey.
While we had no trouble believing the Indian’s story about how the government reneged on their land treaty, we drew the line at the story of the fish man. Our interest having been piqued, though, we took a ride up to the dam to see if the visitor center was open, figuring that we might be able to find some brochures or some other sources of information about Kinzua’s history. We lucked out and, despite the previous night’s rain, the gate to the causeway over the dam was open and we were able to walk out to the small blockhouse at the end of the spillway. There was a park ranger there and we started to shoot the shit with him, telling him about the old Indian and his story.
The officer assured us that the divers from the Army Corp of Engineers did not use cages and had never spotted any “fish creatures.” He said that they had run into some very large catfish and muskellunge. The muskie grew up to eight feet long had some pretty wicked teeth, but they stayed away from the divers and were not enough of a danger to warrant using a diving cage. He also told us that unfortunately, what the old Indian had said about the U.S. government screwing them over was entirely true, right down to the tidbit about there still being some graves that never got relocated. The ranger excused himself for a minute and returned holding a pair of binoculars. One by one, he directed our attention to areas where we could glimpse the remains of the town of Corydon breaking the water’s surface. A church steeple, the roofline of an old building and some brush – the latter which he said were the tops of trees. If you were to take a boat over to that area, you would be able to see the trees’ entire canopies below the surface. More evidence of prior human settlement appeared during periods of drought.
An entire submerged town, sort of like Atlantis. Creepy, but certainly nothing as hair-raising as fishmen.
Having spent the morning listening to the old legend about the valley that we had camped in numerous times before, we were happy to see that the overcast sky was clearing. Perhaps we didn’t need any tarps after all. We returned to camp and spent the afternoon and early evening hiking in the mountains, making a side trip to bring some more large logs back to camp, which we set around the fire to dry out so that we could use them later that night. After dinner, we washed up our kits in a small creek and set to drinking. Once thoroughly drunk, we pulled out our guns for some target practice. Alcohol and guns – a logical combination, right? Fortunately for us, there were never any problems.
After a while, we had settled down and were sitting around the fire waxing nostalgic about previous trips and making plans for future weekends, when we heard an engine revving up nearby. We were about one hundred yards into the woods off the nearest logging road, yet we could see headlights glimmering through the thick forest. Before we had time to realize what was going on, the headlights were speeding past us. The sound of the engine was louder and we could hear the vehicle’s tires skidding on the wet sawdust road. Within seconds, its taillights winked out as it turned a corner.
Eyes wide, Rob exclaimed “Must be one of the locals heading home from the bars.”
“Yeah but… Jesus! He was moving too fast even for dry roads.”
“I’m sure that he’s an old pro,” I said. “Anyway, no skin off our noses.” And so we went back to our business of drinking and bullshitting, growing tired and lying back on our (still squishy) sleeping bags. After what was probably half an hour, we heard the sound of twigs snapping nearby, as if something was walking toward us through the forest undergrowth. Adrenaline surging, we instantly snapped out of our stupor and sat up straight. Something was out there. Looking into the woods in the direction of the sounds, we could see a glowing pair of eyes. It had to be a bear!
There were plenty of black bears in the area, and we had run across more than a few in the time we spent in that forest. One bear in your camp is one bear too many. The bears in the area only ran between ninety and one-hundred fifty pounds, but I use the word “only” very loosely. They have those big, sharp, pointy teeth and claws, you know. The old myth is to hang your food up in a tree to keep the bears away. Well… Bears are very good climbers, and it just becomes a big bear-piñata, so that never really worked. We found that tightly sealed plastic bags work better – even for garbage. Nevertheless, the bears in the area are a bit too familiar with humans and get curious sometimes. Usually making a lot of noise was enough to scare them off, so we tried that this time but the bear answered back.
“Hey! Anybody out there?”
Wary of the late night visitor, Rob already had a hand on his gun. “Yeah. Who’s asking?”
A young guy, maybe early twenties, emerged from the woods. He must have noticed the gun because his hands were raised. “I don’t want any trouble guys. I saw your campfire when I passed by.”
Still on the defensive, Rob asked, “So what? Are you Smoky the Bear?”
“No, man. I was hoping that you could help me out.”
“With what?” As the guy stepped into the light from our campfire, we could see that he was pretty banged up – forehead and left arm bleeding – and that he was limping a little.
“I, uh...” he started sheepishly, “I had a little accident. I was going a bit too fast and flipped my truck up the way.”
“Oh, so that was you!” I said.
“Yeah. It’s slippery out tonight. So, do you guys think that you could help me flip it back on its tires? It’s kinda’ sideways right now. I could probably get it back straight up with some help.”
It sounded like the guy may have been through the same thing before – either himself or with a friend. We put our heads together and talked it over in low voices, then agreed. Rob and Mike would go with him and try to help him out. Being the paranoid city-folk that we were, we decided that I should hang back at the camp. There was always a slim chance that it was a setup. This guy draws us away, and his friends sneak in and take our stuff. It was an unlikely scenario, but we felt more comfortable that way.
Rob and Mike went off into the woods with the unfortunate driver, and I settled back down next to the fire. I laid back and started to relax. Knowing that I wouldn’t be able to fall asleep until they returned, I lay there and listened to the insects and frogs chirruping. It couldn’t have been more than ten minutes before I heard the snapping of twigs again – much too soon for my friends to be back, as I had calculated from the time it took the guy to get from his truck back to us. The thought of facing a bear on my own was a little daunting, but I had done it before. I stared deep into the woods and let my eyes adjust to the darkness.
Once again, it quickly became apparent that it was not a bear coming toward me. Not even a bunch of bears. I saw multiple sets of eyes reflecting the moonlight, and heard voices. The people were speaking in what I assumed to be the Iroquois tongue. There must have been about a dozen of them. In all of our years camping out in the woods in that valley, I had never seen any of the Indians out in the forest. Now, here was a whole band of them – and I was alone. My anxiety grew in proportion to the volume of their voices.
The Indians must have seen my campfire. They passed so close that they could not have possibly missed it, yet they continued on, passing me as if I were not even there, intent on getting to their destination. Curious – or perhaps just plain stupid – I decided to follow them and see where they were going. I don’t know if I was being as stealthy as my drink-addled brain thought or if they truly did not care that I was following. I got bold and closed the distance between them and myself. That’s when I noticed that two of the Indians were half-dragging, half-leading another man who appeared to be in a stupor. Seeing that concerned me, so I dropped back further into the woods.
They group arrived at a clearing at the top of a hill. I recognized it, as there was one very tall, dead, and completely stripped birch tree smack dab in the center. We had thought about cutting it down for firewood at one time, but it was just too darn big. The two Indians who were leading the impaired man approached the tree and lashed him to it with leather thongs. Then they all stepped back and began to chant. I must have gone on for a good half an hour but I remained there, transfixed by the sight and the sound of their invocation.
Then… I shit you not… this thing came out of the woods. I can only attempt to describe it because it was like nothing that I have ever seen. It was like nothing that should possibly have existed on earth.
The creature was undoubtedly Onekahokwe. The fish man. Although it was definitely part fish, I could not have attributed any features of “man” to it other than its un-fishlike appendages. Like a fish, the transition between its head and body was almost indistinguishable. The head/face portion was bulbous and spherical, probably three feet in diameter with a mouth that extended almost all of the way across it. It had two bulging, opaque eyes and a fin running down its spine – sort of like the dorsal fin on a marlin, only bigger. It was scaly, too, and it smelled funny. Not fishy, just… funny. Unlike a fish, though, this creature had long arms that hung from just below its head to the ground. It also had two stumpy legs. All of its limbs ended in flat, webbed, paddles that appeared to have a finger-like bone structure supporting them. Each “finger” or “toe” was tipped with a sharp barb. Based on the proportion of its height to the surrounding men, I would guess that it stood at least eight feet tall.
It was obvious that the Indians had expected the monster to appear, but they still seemed startled and afraid. They quickly scattered and fled into the woods, leaving behind the poor man that they had tied to the tree. He seemed to snap out of his trance at the sight of the fish man, and opened his mouth in a silent scream.
The last clear memory I have of Onekahokwe was when it looked directly at me. Our eyes met and it was as if it peered into my soul. I don’t think that it was at all concerned with my presence but I was not about to hang around to find out. I took off blindly into the woods, slamming my shoulders into trees in the darkness. I had the bruises to prove it the next morning, but at the time I did not care. From behind me came a combination of blood-curdling sounds. One was a human scream, letting me know that the man – a sacrifice, obviously – had found his voice. The other, much louder sound, was like nothing I had ever heard before. I had a feeling that if fish made sounds, it would sound very similar.
In my terror, I got lost in the dark and eventually had to work my way back to a logging road that I could follow back to our campsite. Apparently, I had beaten Rob and Mike back. They must have had quite a bit of trouble getting that guy’s truck set upright. At least I hoped that was why they hadn’t returned yet. I finished off the dregs of the bottle of Echo Springs and then dug into Rob’s backpack looking for more. I was happy to find that he had brought along a bottle of Jack Daniel’s – the good stuff – probably for an “end of summer” or “beginning of fall” celebration. We didn’t need many excuses for celebrations. I felt bad for opening it without the others there, but I needed another drink. That drink ended up being half the bottle.
I wondered what I would tell the guys. They would think that I was crazy or making the whole thing up. The decision had to wait until morning, though, as I had passed out before they returned. I was too hung over and befuddled to say anything the next morning, and I realized that the more time that passed, the more my credibility would suffer.
In the end, I never did end up telling Rob and Mike anything about what had happened. In fact, after a while I even began to doubt myself. Maybe it was all just a bad dream inspired by the old Indian’s story and fueled by the whiskey and too many baked beans. These days, I like to tell myself that it was. Nevertheless, that was my last trip to Kinzua.
Kenneth Kohl http://amazon.com/authokennethkohl
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