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Casino [1995] Showcasing the often violent day-to-day of a gambling handicapper (Robert De Niro) with ties to the mob. Scorsese's excellent film is an expert portrayal of the glitzy, seedy underworld that makes up the foundation of America’s gambling capital. Joe Pesci and Sharon Stone also star.

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[US] Casino (1995) Martin Scorsese directs this tale of a mafia enforcer and a casino executive competing against each other over a gambling empire, and over a fast living and fast loving socialite. With an all star cast including Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci.

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Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone and Joe Pesci star in director Martin Scorsese's riveting look at how blind ambition, white-hot passion and 24-karat greed toppled an empire. Story about the Mob's multi-million dollar casino operation where fortunes and lives were made and lost with a roll of the dice

Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone and Joe Pesci star in director Martin Scorsese's riveting look at how blind ambition, white-hot passion and 24-karat greed toppled an empire. Story about the Mob's multi-million dollar casino operation where fortunes and lives were made and lost with a roll of the dice submitted by ForestRanger42 to bestamazonprimevideo [link] [comments]

Casino [Cast: Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci] [Director:Scorsese]

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A Cinematic Guide to The Weeknd: Pt 3. My Dear Melancholy and After Hours

A Cinematic Guide to The Weeknd: Pt 3. My Dear Melancholy and After Hours

My Dear Melancholy

Gaspar Noe/Cannes Film Festival
The My Dear Melancholy era notable for being a time when The Weeknd was in proximity to a lot of serious directors. While he’s had a foot in Hollywood for awhile, 2017 through 2019 he was actively engaging with filmmakers like the Safdies Brothers, Gaspar Noe, and Claire Denis, amongst others. While he had been actively courting the Safdies since Good Time was released, he attended the 2018 Cannes Film Festival where he crossed paths Noe, whose film Climax took home a number awards at Cannes. Noe’s Enter the Void had previously served as an inspiration for Kiss Land, and for MDM (and later After Hours) seem to call back to Noe’s other films, like Irreversible and Love, which are both twisted depictions of heartbreak. On the other hand, Climax is about a French dance troupe who accidentally take LSD, and according to Noe is not a “message” movie. It is an audacious psychedelic technical exercise, with numerous long takes and highly choreographed set pieces. The idea for Noe, who had previously captured the feeling of drugs in previous films, was to do the opposite, and present the objectively reality of drugs, watching people high from a sober perspective.
Noe is a rather strong advocate of film, and the opening scene of Climax features VHS boxes of a number of films that have influenced his filmmaking. Two of note are Schizophrenia, otherwise known as Angst, one of Noe’s favorite films which The Weeknd name checked to the Safdies, and Possession, which would go on to be an influence on After Hours (more on this later). He is also said to have sat next to Benicio Del Toro at Cannes, which means he likely caught some of the Un Certain Regard section, where Del Toro served as a jury member. Outside of that section, there were a few other films of interest such as The House That Jack Built from Lars Von Trier (The Weeknd has previously expressed affection for Von Trier’s Antichrist), Mandy from Pastos Costamos, and music video director Romain Gavras’s The World Is Yours, as well as a restoration of 2001: A Space Odyssey, which Noe has referred to as the film that got him into filmmaking.
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Asian Cinema
Later in 2018, The Weeknd continued his globetrotting with a tour of Asia. He once claimed in an interview that whenever visiting a foreign country he only watches films from there. I’ve previously written about the influence of Asian cinema on Kiss Land, and there’s not enough work from the MDM era to glean anything cinematically adjacent to this, but now would be a good time to mention that the "Call Out My Name" video was heavily inspired by the work of famed Japanese photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto. The Asian tour poster seems to be a reference to Ichi the Killer, which leads us to Takashi Miike. Though he is notoriously prolific across a number of genres, his most popular works internationally are genre melding blends of horror, comedy and crime, most notably Audition, Ichi the Killer and Gozu. Another film worth mentioning is Perfect Blue, Satoshi Kon’s masterwork about a pop star’s mysterious stalker that The Weeknd posted about on Instagram before. Bloody and haunting, the film was a major influence on Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan and Requiem for a Dream. In Interviews he has also mentioned a number of Korean films, such as The Wailing, I Saw the Devil and Oldboy. While Wong Kar Wai was previously mentioned as an influence on Beauty Behind the Madness, also worth mentioning is the work of John Woo, specifically A Better Tomorrow, well known for the shot of smoking a cigar off money, and Infernal Affairs, Andrew Lau’s crime classic which served has the basis for Scorsese’s The Departed.
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After Hours

Martin Scorsese
While After Hours more so than any other Weeknd album is bursting at the seams with cinematic references, the influence of Martin Scorsese stands above all. Similar to The Weeknd’s body of work, many Scorsese’s are explorations of violence and masculinity, investigating them from a perspective that depending on who you ask (and how they’re feeling) glamorizes, condemns or just simply presents the reality of characters on the fringes of society.
While there are direct references to a number of prominent Scorsese films, what’s interesting is that his influence also reverberates in other films/filmmakers that influence After Hours. Todd Phillips’s Joker is in effect an homage to Scorsese’s loner-centric New York films, and the Safdie Brothers have been putting their own millennial spin on the type of 70s gritty thriller that Scorsese trafficked in (Scorsese was also a producer on Uncut Gems). Specific Scorsese works will be discussed more in depth in the requisite sections, but it is worth mentioning upfront what a prominent role that Scorsese plays in the nucleus of After Hours.
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Urban HorroIsolation
With After Hours, The Weeknd departs from the slicker sounds and influences that permeated Starboy and returns to the cinematic grittiness of Beauty Behind the Madness. While urban horror is a theme that permeates throughout The Weeknd as a project overall, there is a thorough line to be drawn here that follows a number of 70s and 80s cinematic and aesthetic references. For one thing, while the initial bandaged nose was a reference to Chinatown (previously, The Weeknd has a Kiss Land demo titled "Roman Polanski"), the full bandaged face that is so prominently featured throughout the After Hours era is a classic cinematic visual trope that was especially prominent throughout 60s and 80s, though it saw a slight re-emergence in the 2010s. The fully bandaged face is often used to remake someone in the image of another, usually against their will (The Skin I Live In, Eyes Without Face), or as a case of mistaken identity and doppelgängers (Good Night Mommy, Scalpel), themes present throughout much of After Hours. The "Too Late" video acknowledges these references, but instead presents the bandages on two Los Angeles models recovering from plastic surgery, in a nod to a famous Steven Meisel’s photoshoot for Vogue Italia.
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The “masks” people wear is another horror trope that is featured prominently on After Hours, and this is best seen in the red suit character. One important reference in the film is to Brian De Palma’s Dressed To Kill, where a serial killer is targeting the patients of a psychiatrist (any more on this film will veer towards spoiler territory). The Weeknd is on the record as saying Jim Carrey’s The Mask as being a large influence on the Red Suit character, it being one of the first film’s he watched in theaters. One of the more complex references would be to Joker. While it sort of an in-joke that the character of the Joker is commonly overanalyzed and misinterpreted, referencing Todd Phillips’s Joker is more nuanced because it is in essence a full on homage to Martin Scorsese’s New York films, most notably Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy, which focus on eccentric loners, and can both be seen as cautionary tale of urban isolation, a theme explored perhaps in songs like "Faith." The King of Comedy revolves around a would be obsessive stand up Rupert Pupkin haggling his way to perform on late night TV, with The Weeknd’s talk show appearances being a prominent part of the early After Hours marketing, most notably in the “short film”. This idea of isolated and compressed urbanites recurs throughout After Hours and it’s films.
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The idea of urban repression is in the subway scene of the After Hours short film. The entire film itself is something of a reference to the subway scene to Possession (another Gaspar Noe favorite), mimicking the (also subway set) scene in which Isabelle Adjani’s Anna convulses on the subway due to a miscarriage, as well as Jacob’s Ladder, a 90s cult classic horror film starring Tim Robbins as a Vietnam vet (like Taxi Driver’s Travis Bickle) who is experiencing demonic hallucinations, encountering them in the subway and later at a party he attends, splitting the scene into two.
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Las Vegas
As always, The Weeknd once again grounds After Hours with a strong sense of place, this time setting the album against a nocturnal odyssey through Las Vegas. One of the most prominent films is Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam’s adaptation of Hunter S. Thompson’s book. This is directly referenced in the "Heartless" video, which sees The Weeknd and Metro Boomin in the Johnny Depp and Benicio Del Toro roles as they tumble through a Las Vegas casino. The Weeknd has gone on the record to state that the famous red suit character was influenced by Sammy Davis Jr.’s character in the film Poor Devil. However, similar red suit has also been sported by a number of Vegas characters, most notably Richard Pryor and Robert De Niro’s Sam Rothstein in Martin Scorsese’s Casino. With the red suit, The Weeknd seems to be playing with the idea of a devil-ish other, another side of his personality that emerges in Las Vegas.
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While the city lights are the oft discussed part of part of Las Vegas, it should be noted that similar to Beauty Behind the Madness, the desert that surrounds Las Vegas is just as important to the juxtaposition of its beauty. The "Until I Bleed Out" video ends/"Snowchild" video in the desert, similar to the confrontation between Robert De Niro’s and Joe Pesci’s showdown in the desert in Casino, as well as Joe Pesci's death in Goodfellas. The idea of a hedonistic desert playground also bears semblance to Westworld, both the film and the TV show. The desert seems to represent some sort of freedom to The Weeknd, as the "Snowchild" video portrays the desert as a pensive location for reflection, as well as the "In Your Eyes" video showing the girl prominently dancing with the dismembered head out in the open, in reference to The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, another prominent desert film.
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New York/The Safdies
Despite it’s Las Vegas setting, After Hours also takes a good amount from films set in New York, most notably Martin Scorsese’s 1983 film After Hours. Besides the title, After Hours is similarly about a twisting and turning nighttime odyssey. The film stars Griffin Dunne as Paul, a working class stiff who heads downtown to rendezvous with a woman he met at a diner earlier that night. Of course, things don’t turn out the way they should, chaos ensues, and Paul is set on a dangerous trek back uptown. Like the film, the album After Hours is set off by a woman (though the album takes more stock in romantic endeavors), seems to be set over a single night (or at least a condensed period of time), and involves similar chaos and misadventures (sirens at night at the end of Faith). Tonally, After Hours the film is more comedic perhaps than After Hours the album, however The Weeknd is on the record as having said that "Heartless" and "Blinding Lights" placement on the album is intended to be somewhat comedic, reflecting exaggerated machismo and ecstasy, respectively (to comedic effect).
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Another of the most prominent filmmakers of After Hours are the Safdies, who featured The Weeknd in Uncut Gems. They also served as a link to Oneohtrix Point Never, who scored their last two films and later worked After Hours. I believe there are three major film tropes (not genres) that inspired After Hours, all of which the Safdies’s have engaged with. There is the one-long-night films, in which a character spends one-long-night on the run from whatever chaos and forces may be that they left in their path. This can be seen in the Good Time, as well as After Hours (the movie). Then, there is the descent-into-madness type, where a character slowly loses grip with reality and ends up in over their head (something like Scarface or Breaking Bad, but for our purposes Jacob’s Ladder can be categorized here as well), which the Safdies did with Uncut Gems. Lastly, but maybe most importantly, the Safdies also explored toxic romance (more on this later) in their less seen film Heaven Knows What, about two heroin addicts and the destructiveness their love brings out in each other, an idea that recurs throughout After Hours on songs like "Until I Bleed Out" and "Nothing Compares." A recurring song throughout Heaven Knows What is Isao Tomita’s synth version of Debussy’s "Claire De Lune", which is featured in some episodes of Memento Mori and bears some resemblance to the start of "Alone Again".
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Obsession/Toxic Romance
While love and lust and the ups and downs with it have been a formative part of The Weeknd’s ideology and themes, I don’t think it would be remiss to say that After Hours is perhaps his most outwardly romantic album. Despite this, one of the major arcs of the album is toxicity that comes with it, which a number of already mentioned films deal with. While "In Your Eyes" is one of the more romantic and accessible songs on the album, a re-assessment of it Ala Sting’s “Every Breathe You Take” could frame it as lonely obsessing, such as Travis Bickle’s infatuation with Jodie Foster’s teenage prostitute Iris, Joker's fixation on Murray Franklin, Rupert Pupkin’s obsession with Jerry Langford. Casino also deals with toxic romance, another prominent theme in After Hours, best seen in the love triangle that forms between Sam, his partner Nicky and his wife Ginger, played by Joe Pesci and Sharon Stone respectively.
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In almost all of the After Hours’s video content, The Weeknd seems to constantly meet his demise at the hands of women. Another interesting reference that may be something of a reach is to Phantom Thread, Paul Thomas Anderson’s film about Reynolds Woodcock, a couture dressmaker loosely based on Cristobal Balenciaga and his muse Alma, played by Daniel Day Lewis and Vicky Krieps, respectively. The film delves into their dysfunctional relationship, with Woodcock berating her and Alma poisoning his tea to keep him dependent on her. One of the highpoint of the film is a New Years Eve Party that bears strong resemblance to the "Until I Bleed Out" video. While the balloons may just be a callback to his earlier work, there is something about the color grading/temperature and the production design of the "Until I Bleed Out" video (as well as parts of the "Blinding Lights" video) that made me immediately think of Phantom Thread. A similar relationship is seen in the German horror film Der Fan, which The Weeknd has mentioned in a recent interview. In Der Fan, a young girl Simone spends her days obsessing over popstar R, until she finally encounters him outside his studio. The film is similar to the aforementioned Takashi Miike’s Audition in its exploration of obsession and idealization. In the film, an older man puts up a fake casting call to search for the perfect girlfriend. While Audition explores these themes from an Eastern perspective of societal pressure, Der Fan explores it through a Western lens of pop idolization and idealization. Both films deal with the idea that despite outward appearances, the perfect partner does not exist, and anyone that claims to be (or has the expectations put on them) is not who they seem.
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One film he has spoken at length about is Trouble Everyday, Claire Denis’s arthouse vampire movie. The film stars Vincent Gallo as Shane, a scientist who travels to Paris under the guise of his honeymoon to track down core, a woman who he was once obsessed with who has now become a vampire. Core is locked up in a basement but sometimes sneaks out to seduce and consume unwilling victims. This seems to be where some of the bloody face stuff comes from, but I believe it’s influence is a little more conceptual. To me, a good companion film to Trouble Everyday is American Psycho, which seems to also have been a thematic influence on After Hours. Both films concern idealized version of masculinity and femininity, both very sexual and physical, but hostile as well. American Psycho ends with Patrick Bateman confessing to the killing of a prostitute, but no one believe him. Trouble Everyday ends with Shane killing Core, but Shane is unable to arouse himself after that except through violence. Koji Wakamatsu, a former Yakuza turned prominent extreme Japanese filmmaker (and a major influence on Gaspar Noe) is quoted as saying “For me, violence, the body and sex are an integral part of life.” Despite being hollow, idealized impressions of the self, a vampire and as a banker (cold, seductive bloodsuckers = monsters), Patrick Bateman and Core represent the Frankenstein-ian relationship between sexuality and violence, which I believe is the main theme of After Hours. Truly, we hurt the ones we love.
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Postscript

To cap things off, I would just like to illuminate some key takeaways. As a filmmaker myself, this has been an extremely helpful exercise in understanding other artists process and ideas.
Steeped in the history of the medium…
It’s clear that The Weeknd is not your typical “I’m influenced by cinema” artist but an extremely legit film buff with serious credentials. The Weeknd’s film taste leans towards 70s-00s genre works, mostly horror, drama and thriller, and is well versed in the classics but also has the nose to sniff out deeper cuts and obscurities. The mantra of “good artists borrow, great artists steal” works even better if not many people know where you’re stealing from! What is impressive to me is that he is not just versed in “mainstream” obscurities, but also serious deep cuts. Films like Possession and Phantom of the Paradise may not stick out to the average person on the street but are well known in most film circles. Films like Inland Empire and New Rose Hotel (Der Fan was especially impressive to me, it is one of my favorite films) however are not as well known and it is very impressive to me that he can come across films like that, and really get enough out of it to bring into his own work.
…is able to interpolate contemporary/mainstream films…
This perhaps is one of the most impressive aspects of his integration of film into The Weeknd’s work. It is very easy for film buffs to get lost within their own obscure taste, living in a world where everyone is an idiot for not knowing who Shinya Tsukamoto. Trilogy and Kiss Land had a lot of contemporary obscurities, like Stalker, David Lynch etc., well known but they still existed as artifacts, not of the time we live in. However, perhaps picking something from his work on Fifty Shades of Grey, of late he has kept his finger on the zeitgeist and anticipated/integrated what the filmmakers of today are doing, such as his work on Black Panther and Game of Thrones, general appreciation of Tarantino, the works of Nicolas Winding Refn in Starboy, and his use of the Joker and Uncut Gems on After Hours, both of which came out just a few months before the album. It feels Jackson-esque, and I believe this is one thing that will help him further in his quest for pop stardom.
…while also being fully in tune to the works of modern transgressive auteurs…
In addition to keeping up with the mainstream is in touch with, The Weeknd also makes it a point to seek out and learn from the cutting edge filmmakers of today. While the Safdies were always going to blow up, I don’t doubt that a Weeknd co-sign accelerated their rise. Gaspar Noe is one thing, Enter the Void and Irreversible exist as masterpieces of the mainstream obscurities I’ve been mentioning, but he really truly tries to understand the heart of Noe’s work, even going so far back as to understand Noe’s influences (I sincerely hope he is tuned in to the work of Koji Wakamatsu). But most of all, to be a fan of Claire Denis is one thing, but to seek her out and make her an offer that she ACCEPTED is absolutely astounding to me. Just spitballing but it would be like if Michael Jackson shot a music video with Rainer Werner Fassbinder (who I’d bet good money that The Weeknd was put on to by Noe). We can only PRAY that one day we will be blessed with a David Lynch Weeknd video.
---------------------------
…and that just about does it. Hope you enjoyed this and thanks for being patient with me. I got quite busy after the first two and had my own projects/work going that kept me occupied. As we’re still technically in the After Hours era, I also wanted to wait until a few more videos and interviews came out to aid me in my research.
I also wanted to find enough time to make the Letterboxd for this. I personally don’t love Letterboxd culture, I find the popular culture surrounding the site a bit snobbish and exclusive, but I’ve gotten a number of requests for one and you gotta give the people what they want. Throughout the list are a few films that he hasn’t mentioned but are some of my personal favorites and I believe Weeknd fans will like, I encourage you to accidentally stumble upon things on it. Don't overthink, just pick something and watch!
If you’d like to follow me further, you can find me on Instagram here, where I post about film reviews Letterboxd style. I prefer Instagram so that more average people see it instead of an echo chamber of film snobs. I am also a filmmaker myself, I just recently wrapped this short film and am currently in the process of putting together my next project.
The main reason I did this however, besides a general appreciation of The Weeknd’s work, was to put more people on to the beautiful art form that is cinema. One thing I learned from Scorsese is that one must be an advocate and truly champion your medium. I hope that this encourages to check out more interesting movies than they wouldn’t normally come across, and I hope this will inspire more people to create more as well, whether it be to write, make films, music, anything. If even one person picks up a pencil, a camera or a keyboard because of these posts, I will be satisfied.
Thanks all!
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Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
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Reddit Chosen Oscars: 1995 Winners

Best Picture
1. Toy Story
2. Seven
3. Before Sunrise
4. Apollo 13
5. The Usual Suspects
6. Braveheart
6. Heat
8. Casino
9. Babe
10. 12 Monkeys
Best Director
  1. David Fincher for Seven
  2. Ron Howard for Apollo 13
  3. Mel Gibson for Braveheart
  4. Michael Mann for Heat
  5. Richard Linklater for Before Sunrise
Best Lead Actor
  1. Nicolas Cage as Ben Sanderson in Leaving Las Vegas
  2. Ethan Hawke as Jesse in Before Sunrise
  3. Morgan Freeman as William Somerset in Seven
  4. Tom Hanks as Jim Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Sean Penn as Matthew Poncelet in Dead Man Walking
Best Lead Actress
1. Julie Delpy as Céline in Before Sunrise
2. Sharon Stone as Ginger McKenna in Casino
3. Susan Sarandon as Sister Helen Prejean in Dead Man Walking
4. Nicole Kidman as Suzanne Stone-Maretto in To Die For
4. Elisabeth Shue as Sera in Leaving Las Vegas
6. Emma Thompson as Elinor Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
Best Supporting Actor
  1. Kevin Spacey as Roger "Verbal" Kint/Keyser Söze in The Usual Suspects
  2. Brad Pitt as Jeffrey Goines in 12 Monkeys
  3. Ed Harris as Gene Kranz in Apollo 13
  4. James Cromwell as Arthur Hoggett in Babe
  5. Joe Pesci as Nicky Santoro in Casino
Best Supporting Actress
  1. Kate Winslet as Marianne Dashwood in Sense and Sensibility
  2. Gwyneth Paltrow as Tracy Mills in Seven
  3. Mira Sorvino as Linda Ash in Mighty Aphrodite
  4. Kathleen Quinlan as Marilyn Gerlach Lovell in Apollo 13
  5. Joan Allen as Pat Nixon in Nixon
Best Original Screenplay
  1. Toy Story
  2. Seven
  3. Before Sunrise
  4. The Usual Suspects
  5. La Haine
Best Adapted Screenplay
1. 12 Monkeys
2. Casino
3. Apollo 13
4. Babe
4. Sense and Sensibility
6. Leaving Las Vegas
Best Animated Film
1. Toy Story
2. Ghost in the Shell
3. Pocahontas
3. Whisper of the Heart
5. A Goofy Movie
Best Non-English Language Film
  1. La Haine
  2. Ghost in the Shell
  3. Il Postino: The Postman
  4. Whisper of the Heart
  5. Underground
Best Documentary Film
  1. A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies
  2. The Battle Over Citizen Kane
  3. Anne Frank Remembered
  4. Frank and Ollie
  5. Unzipped
Best Original Score
  1. Toy Story
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Seven
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Original Song
  1. "You’ve Got a Friend in Me" from Toy Story
  2. "Colors of the Wind" from Pocahontas
  3. "Gangsta’s Paradise" from Dangerous Minds
  4. "GoldenEye" from GoldenEye
  5. "Hold Me, Thrill Me, Kiss Me, Kill Me" from Batman Forever
Best Sound
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Heat
  3. Toy Story
  4. Braveheart
  5. Seven
Best Production Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Seven
  4. 12 Monkeys
  5. Sense and Sensibility
Best Cinematography
  1. Seven
  2. Braveheart
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Makeup/Hairstyling
1. Braveheart
2. Batman Forever
2. Seven
4. Clueless
5. 12 Monkeys
Best Costume Design
  1. Braveheart
  2. Sense and Sensibility
  3. Clueless
  4. Casino
  5. 12 Monkeys
Best Editing
  1. Seven
  2. Apollo 13
  3. Heat
  4. Casino
  5. Braveheart
Best Visual Effects
  1. Apollo 13
  2. Toy Story
  3. Babe
  4. Jumanji
  5. Batman Forever
Best Voice Acting Performance
  1. Tom Hanks as Woody in Toy Story
  2. Tim Allen as Buzz Lightyear in Toy Story
  3. Christine Cavanaugh as Babe in Babe
  4. Bill Farmer as Goofy in A Goofy Movie
  5. Irene Bedard and Judy Kuhn as Pocahontas in Pocahontas
Best Directorial Debut
  1. John Lasseter for Toy Story
  2. Noah Baumbach for Kicking and Screaming
  3. F. Gary Gray for Friday
  4. Michael Bay for Bad Boys
  5. Larry Clark for Kids
Best Ensemble Cast
  1. The Usual Suspects
  2. Seven
  3. Apollo 13
  4. Heat
  5. Casino
Best Choreography, Stunts or Dance
  1. Braveheart
  2. Heat
  3. GoldenEye
  4. Rumble in the Bronx
  5. Apollo 13
Best Soundtrack
  1. Toy Story
  2. Pocahontas
  3. Casino
  4. Clueless
  5. Batman Forever
Best Non-English Language Performance
  1. Vincent Cassel as Vinz in La Haine
  2. Massimo Troisi as Mario Ruoppolo in Il Postino: The Postman
  3. Gong Li as Xiao Jinbao in Shanghai Triad
  4. Isabelle Huppert as Jeanne in La Ceremonie
  5. Miki Manojlović as Marko Dren in Underground
Preferential ballot for this year
Full charts for all the categories
submitted by JuanRiveara to Oscars [link] [comments]

IJW: Casino (1995)

Martin Scorsese delivers another high octane gangster story with Robert De Niro as the real life casino owner Sam “Ace” Rosenthal. Though I wouldn’t say I liked this as much as “Goodfellas”, this movie is still an incredible piece of film that’s not talked about enough. In many ways, this film is similar to past Scorsese pictures—mainly “Goodfellas” and “Raging Bull”—but it’s also different in a number of ways.
Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci (Pesci playing Nicky Santoro) make a wonderful duo. Niro’s character has this intense and calculating feel to him at all times. There are many scenes where Niro as Ace is watching for cheaters in his casino, and his facial expressions are able to convey how analytical the character is. Pesci, of course, plays the “tough guy” role the best that he can. Like in “Goodfellas”, he’s a crazy guy that could go off the handle at any time. I also can’t not mention Sharon Stone as Ginger. She plays a person that’s self-destructive and selfish. Let me tell you, she can play a person you can hate. There’s even a sequence where she nearly kidnaps Ace’s kid. Even though I’ve never been around anyone like that, I could tell that the display of someone who never learns and ends up with same problem constantly was realistic.
The cinematography, music, and writing are three notable things in this movie that jumped at me. I can still see the many glamorous shots of the casinos, the money, and the high life. One specific shot that made me say “woah” was when Ace was waiting for a meeting with Nicky in the middle of the desert. As Ace is looking at Nicky’s car pull up, we see the car’s reflection in Ace’s sunglasses. I thought that was a cool shot that’s able to show how nervous Ace was at the moment. Moving on to the music, Scorsese is an expert at matching music to his films. The only directors I know that do it as good or better are Tarantino and Kubrick. From beginning to end, the music marks certain changes that are happening in life. At first, the music is happy and about good things. Then the songs change to more darker themes as the film progresses. Not to sound like a broke record, but that’s similar to how “Goodfellas” did it. Finally, the writing was effective and powerful. I was absorbed into the story from first few seconds. I wanted to hear and see what was going to happen, and I just loved seeing how Ace lived his life. Additionally, the way that characters speak to each other felt real. And those argument scenes between Ace and Ginger have this somber and authentic mood to it. Frankly, everything about this film is astounding.
When I was watching this, I picked up on the theme of trust. More specifically, how trust can affect relationships. I noticed that this came up quite often: Ace wanted to make sure he could trust Ginger; Ace and Nicky trusted each other; and the bosses trusted Ace. But once this trust is broken in any of these relationships, the relationship itself fails. Ace couldn’t trust Ginger, so their marriage was failing. Ace and Nicky weren’t good friends anymore because Nicky didn’t trust him. And the bosses almost killed Ace because of the distrust. For all three, the reason trust was broken was because of greed. This goes to show, trust is a vital aspect of any relationship. If your head is not in the right place, everyone will eventually drift away from you. In this way, I find this film is like “Raging Bull”. Except here, it’s the woman that’s causing the problem. To further explain, “Raging Bull” is about a man who’s distrusting of his wife for no reason other than his paranoia, and “Casino” is about a man who’s distrusting of his wife because his wife is an unfaithful person. I like how you get two different versions of the same issue if you’ve watched both movies.
As for any underlying issues, I don’t have any deep concerns other than that the theme of “crime doesn’t pay” in here is generic since so many other movies has this message. I will say, though, that this film did not resonate with me like past Scorsese films have. It might be because I think “Goodfellas” is a better movie, or maybe the movie didn’t try anything too unique in its delivery.
As I’m wrapping up this review, I’d like to say that this is a fun movie that any fan of gangster movies or Scorsese films can get behind. You will not be disappointed if you chose to view it. All aspects of filmmaking and acting is masterful. I will rate this a 9.2/10.
submitted by supermetroid94 to Ijustwatched [link] [comments]

Goodfellas or Casino?

For me it is Casino all the way and I do recognize that Goodfellas came first.
submitted by Buck0Five to movies [link] [comments]

TMS [2] #50: Casino [1995] [And My Full List So Far]

3/31/19-9/1/19
IMDB synopsis: “A tale of greed, deception, money, power, and murder occur between two best friends: a mafia enforcer and a casino executive, compete against each other over a gambling empire, and over a fast living and fast loving socialite.”
I’ve seen pretty much ALL the big-name gangster movies, with the exception of Casino and maybe one or two others. I’m not sure why it’s taken me so long to see Casino, but I’m in good company, because it didn’t do too well at the box office. And even though it was highly-praised by critics, it was almost totally ignored at the Oscars.
Watching this over the weekend, I can confidently say this is a very good (but not great) movie.
What I liked it: Robert DeNiro, Joe Pesci, and Sharon Stone in their primes playing tailor-made roles; great cinematography and set design (Scorsese specialties); and a reasonably coherent and compelling plot.
What I didn’t like: The pacing is off (the first 45 minutes are slow), Stone’s character motivation was weird (it was never explained why she hated her husband so much), and the ending probably needed a little more explanation too (in terms of why some characters did OK, while others…well…didn’t).
What makes Casino shine above everything else is its acting. I’m a big fan of DeNiro and Pesci, and they were superb (especially in the second half). The plot was slightly formulaic, but it was different enough from other gangster films that I felt invested. Ultimately, I can’t call this a great movie because the plot wasn’t quite fresh enough, but it’s definitely a hidden-gem if you like gangster films and R-rated dramas.
Rating: 7.0 / 10
Oh, and since I’m at the halfway mark of The Challenge, I’ve pasted a list of all 50 movies below. The mean rating is 6.2.
(Very Good Movies)
7.4 - Pokemon Detective Pikachu
7.4 - Missing 411: The Hunted [Documentary]
7.3 - Black Hawk Down
7.2 - Bully
7.1 - Hellboy [2019 Version]
7.0 - Casino
6.9 - The Red Pill [Documentary]
6.7 - The Boy in the Plastic Bubble
6.7 - John Wick: Chapter 3: Parabellum
6.7 - Meeting Gorbachev [Documentary]
6.6 - Godzilla: King of the Monsters
6.6 - Bohemian Rhapsody
6.6 - The Pianist
6.6 - March of the Penguins [Documentary]
6.6 - The Belko Experiment
6.5 - Hotel Rwanda
6.5 - Another Day in Paradise
(Good Movies)
6.5 - Pet Semetary [2019 Version]
6.5 - May
6.4 - The Little Bear Movie
6.4 - 47 Meters Down
6.3 - The Green Inferno
6.3 - Brightburn
6.3 - I Am Mother
6.2 - The Blue Lagoon
6.2 - A Time to Kill
6.1 - Dr. Strangelove
6.1 - Freddy vs. Jason
6.0 - The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
6.0 - The Perfection
(OK Movies)
5.9 - Enemy
5.9 - The Void
5.8 - Captive State
5.7 - Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star
5.7 - Avengers: Endgame
5.6 - Escape Room
5.6 - Creep
5.6 - I Saw the Devil
5.5 - Devil
5.3 - Short Term 12
5.0 - A Star is Born [2018 Version]
(Blah Movies)
4.9 - Us
4.9 - Annabelle Comes Home
4.4 - Krampus
4.0 - Dragged Across Concrete
4.0 - House of the Devil
(Bad Movies)
3.9 - Glass
3.9 - Paddleton
3.2 - Wassup Rockers
(Terrible Movies)
2.3 - Get Out
submitted by TMS2017 to 100movies365days [link] [comments]

I honestly and concretely think that “Casino” is superior to “Goodfellas” in every single aspect

I love Scorcese’s movies and I am a huge fan of De Niro and Pesci, however, Casino has much more striking cinematography, more iconic scenes, more of Joe Pesci, Sharon Stone, a much longer movie without a dull moment.
I can understand why people like “Goodfellas” as more raw, but Casino even has a better soundtrack with classic songs and some incredible scenes, the meeting in the desert is actually one of the greatest scenes in history, because of the way it was directed, shot, and because of the incredible chemistry between De Niro and Pesci.
Nicky is a much more ruthless and menacing character than Tommy in goodfellas in my opinion.
I once tried to only view the good scenes in Casino as I watched it prolly a hundred times, and I ended up watching the whole thing.
I love both movies but in my opinion, Casino wins by a mile!
submitted by stevie855 to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

Which movie is the better of the two--Casino or The Departed.

Both movies directed by Martin Scorsese and have great movies stars like Robert De Niro. Sam 'Ace' Rothstein. Sharon Stone. Ginger McKenna. Joe Pesci. Nicky Santoro. James Woods. Lester Diamond. Don Rickles. Billy Sherbert. Alan King. Andy Stone. Kevin Pollak. Phillip Green. L.Q. Jones. Pat Webb. Dick Smothers. Senator. Frank Vincent in Casino and Leonardo DiCaprio,, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson, Mark Wahlberg, Martin Sheen, Ray Winstone to name just a few in The Departed
submitted by Queensideattack to moviecritic [link] [comments]

Re-evaluating Martin Scorsese's Casino

Out of all the films I used to feel ambivalent about but which I have since positively reappraised due to my wife’s having watched them over and over in front of me, none has risen more dramatically in my estimation than Martin Scorsese’s Casino. I first saw it during its original theatrical run in 1995 when I was 20-years-old. I left the theater feeling disappointed — mainly because it failed to live up to Goodfellas, the prior Scorsese movie that it seemed to most closely resemble. They both, after all, featured Robert DeNiro and Joe Pesci as mobsters, there were shocking bursts of violence, epic tracking shots, copious amounts of voice-over narration, healthy doses of black humor, eclectic soundtracks on which the Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter” prominently featured, and so on. Comparisons were always going to be unavoidable. But what really rankled was the way Casino seemed to me like a gaudier, more Hollywood-ized version of Goodfellas — as if Scorsese and co-writer Nicholas Pileggi had taken some of the elements of their successful earlier film and re-shuffled them with the added commercial elements of a Las Vegas setting, a bigger budget and the star power of Sharon Stone (then one of Hollywood’s hottest commodities). While I did admire Casino for its impressive and undeniable cinematic value (it was the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Scorsese and his now-longtime cinematographer Robert Richardson), I largely felt indifferent about it on the whole.
Almost 20 years later, after revisiting the film many times on television and Blu-ray, all of my previous complaints have been swept aside and I now consider it one of Scorsese’s finest works. When I first saw it, one thing I didn’t quite understand was what Scorsese was up to in regards to the Las Vegas setting. I remember feeling back then that the quintessential “New York filmmaker” seemed out of his element “out west” and that, in spite of a few faux-documentary interludes, he didn’t seem to have much of an affinity for the gambling scene. (This is born out by the fact that, to this day, serious gamblers appear to prefer the 1998 poker film Rounders as their Vegas movie of choice.) I realize now that it was wrong of me to have expected the same kind of lovingly detailed views of Las Vegas as those of New York City that can be seen in Scorsese’s other films. For Scorsese, Las Vegas is primarily a metaphor: it’s a “paradise lost” to his gangster characters from “back East.” The notion that Sam “Ace” Rothstein and Nicky Santoro (the characters played by DeNiro and Pesci, respectively) had it all and then blew it is one of the ways in which the film poignantly shows the influence of one of Scorsese’s favorite movies, Raoul Walsh’s Prohibition-set masterpiece The Roaring Twenties. Both Scorsese and Walsh seem to be saying that no matter how violent, immoral and unconscionable the behavior of their characters might be, they were inextricably part of a colorful and exciting era that has since been replaced by something duller and more sanitized. The tone of each movie is therefore elegiac and bittersweet.
As far as the “gaudiness” is concerned, I now believe this is actually Casino‘s strongest stylistic virtue: there is much more voice-over than in Goodfellas, the music is nearly wall-to-wall and the song choices are wackier (e.g., Devo’s cover of “Satisfaction”!), while the clothes, the decor, and the use of color are all deliriously over-the-top. In 1995, what I somehow missed was the way Scorsese and his production team’s deliberately outrageous sense of style was taking its cues directly from the Vegas setting, and I was more apt to criticize the film then for what it wasn’t (i.e., another Goodfellas) rather than what it was (the tragedy of a man who was given the keys to the kingdom of a modern-day Babylon and then willingly let them slip through his fingers). In contrast to the eternal coolness of the 1950s and 1960s New York-milieu of Goodfellas — with its great cars, clothes and music — nearly everything about Casino, in terms of content and form, is rooted in the tackiness of the Las Vegas fashions of the 1970s and early 1980s. And what I didn’t see at the time but what has since become abundantly clear in hindsight is how much this tackiness also provides the film with some of its most inspired and humorous touches. This is nowhere more evident than in the amazing poster recently created by a Boston-based artist that depicts every suit worn by Ace Rothstein in the movie.
submitted by michaelgsmith to TrueFilm [link] [comments]

Movie Dicks for April 8th, 2017: "RIP Don Rickles"

Known as "The Merchant of Venom" and "Mr. Warmth," comedy has lost an icon...

RIP Don Rickles

We are celebrating the life of Don Rickles (1926-2017) tonight with two vastly different performances from different points in his life. We start with a dramatic role in Martin Scorsese's brilliant trip back to the world of mobsters and the seventies, featuring an all-star cast and electric filmmaking. Then, we go back further in time to WWII, as another all-star cast gets involved in a comedic heist to steal some Nazi gold. So be there at the early starting time, you hockey pucks!   The show begins at 7:00 PM CDT in the PreRec Twitch chat.
 
 

Synopses:

Casino (1995): Greed, deception, money, power, and murder occur between two best friends: a mafia enforcer and a former sports handicapper turned casino executive, for a trophy wife over a gambling empire. Directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe Pesci, James Woods, Don Rickles, Alan King, Kevin Pollack and Frank Vincent.   Kelly's Heroes (1970): A group of U.S. soldiers sneaks across enemy lines to get their hands on a secret stash of Nazi treasure. Directed by Brian G. Hutton, starring Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Don Rickles, Carroll O'Connor, Donald Sutherland and Gavin MacLeod.  
submitted by synnrman to moviedicks [link] [comments]

regachoisiah: #2 Casino (1995)

Today is June 1, 2018
Started on May 31, 2018
Absolutely fantastic mobster movie. Really, that's all you need to know about Casino. It was stylish, acting from everyone was top-notch, and the story was engaging from beginning to end. Soundtrack was great, dialogue was great, and even though it was a bit lengthy, you don't really feel the running time. It's one of my favorite mobster movies and my personal favorite Martin Scorsese movie (keep in mind, I haven't seen Goodfellas or Taxi Driver yet. I'll get to them someday).
Speaking of performances, I want to highlight Sharon Stone for acting her ass off. I mean, she absolutely stole the movie for me. She really made you believe that she was this trainwreck ruining De Niro and Pesci's lives throughout the whole movie and the crazier she got, the better her performance was. Sure, Joe Pesci's Nicky is the actual main antagonist and he was phenomenal as well, but I absolutely loathed Stone's Ginger, which is a good sign for your villain.
Now, to balance the praise, I do have one minor nitpick. I love the voice-over narration but there were parts where I felt the narration took me out of the movie. When the voice-overs were used to convey an emotion or to illustrate a character's mindset, they elevate the movie. But sometimes, they just explain what's happening onscreen. You're already showing us what's happening, no need to tell all the time.
So overall...4.5 out of 5 stars. Loses half a star for the "show, don't tell" nitpick but still, it's an outstanding movie. Highly recommend! Imdb: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112641/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt
submitted by regachoisiah to 100movies365days [link] [comments]

Comic Book Movies by One Degree Game

So a buddy and I like to play degree of separation games when it comes to actors in movies and I think I've found one that cannot be beaten. Ever since X-Men came out back in 2000, the superhero movie genre has exploded. Superhero movies before then were a rarity and when they did come out, they never really supported big named actors sometimes they did, but not normally). But superhero movies are so prevalent nowadays that one could argue that there is not an actoactress in Hollywood that isn't somehow connected to a superhero movie within just one degree of separation. So while there may exist an actor how has never been in a superhero movie, they have undoubtedly been in a movie with someone who has.
Example: Tom Cruise has never been in a superhero movie, but he was in Tropic Thunder with Robert Downey, Jr. who was in Iron Man.
or
Joe Pesci has never been in a superhero movie, but he was in Casino with Sharon Stone who was in Catwoman. Let's not count that one cause that movie sucked. But he was in JFK with Gary Oldman who was in The Dark Knight.
Get the idea? So the way this works is you want to try and think of an actor who cannot be connected to a superhero movie within one degree of separation. It is a lot harder than you think, as I have yet to come up with a single one.
Some basic rules though:
1) Can be an actor living or dead BUT has to be an actor who has been predominant in modern film. So no actors like Humphrey Bogart. But actors like Marlon Brando work. Basically no actors that weren't alive after 2000 (even though you could most likely still name connections).
2) Can not be a foreign language actor unless they have broken into US cinema. Example Audrey Tautou who was in the DaVinci Code with Tom Hanks who was in Road to Perdition (which, yes...was based on a graphic novel).
3) Movies have to be either based on a comic book or graphic novel. TV shows, cartoons, anime (unless its a manga) do not count.
4) Actor has to have been involved in a mainstream film. So no unknown indie actors unless they have since been involved in mainstream movies now or at some point.
5) Movies named have to be live-action movies. I just feel that ensemble casts in animated features make this near impossible. Jack Black would be connected with many others simply because of Kung Fu Panda. Without that one, it makes it a little tougher. But still doable. Jack Black was in The Jackal with Bruce Willis who was in Sin City.
6) Movie that is named has to be a movie that has been released. So saying Joe Pesci was in JFK with Kevin Costner who is in Superman: Man of Steel would not count since the movie has not been released yet.
So in the comments below. Name an actor and see if anyone can name a comic book connection within one degree. I will award all the points in the world for someone who can successfully name an actor who cannot be tied to a comic book movie by one degree of separation.
Can someone do it? My friend and I have been playing this game for years and have yet to name one.
submitted by Beeslo to movies [link] [comments]

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Filming Locations of the movie "Casino" from Martin Scorsese with Robert de Niro, Sharon Stone and Joe Pesci as main actors. It was mainly filmed in Las Vegas. I do not own the movie or the music ... Sharon Stone Hot Kissing And Boobs Press ScenesFor More Hot Buzzhttps://hotbuzz.page.link/Zi7X "Casino" is a 1995 American epic crime drama film directed by "Martin Scorsese" and starring "Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci & Sharon Stone".Casino was released o... I am behind Sharon Stone & Joe Pesci coming through the door with my 'girl'. Stone was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Dramatic Role. She did not win, However I am in a scene ... Share your videos with friends, family, and the world Ginger tries to convince Nicky to kill Ace. All rights reserved to Universal Pictures Joe Pesci/Nicky Santoro "Don't look at me, pal, I gotta live with her". By Martin Scorsese (1995) About Press Copyright Contact us Creators Advertise Developers Terms Privacy Policy & Safety How YouTube works Test new features Press Copyright Contact us Creators ... Casino is a 1995 American epic crime film directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, and Joe Pesci. It is based on the nonfiction book Casino: Love and Honor in Las Vegas ... Casino movie psycho realm

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